Many people who haven't yet had the chance to try an Apple Watch are still wondering whether or not it will have a place in their lives and workflows.

Some don't think it will, at least not any time soon. Those who've been using it for a while, including Apple's CEO Tim Cook, say it's already become invaluable to them — That it saves them from having to pull their iPhone from their pockets or purses, that it helps them live better healthier lives, and that it helps them hook into all the digital things around them. Matthew Panzarino does a great job distilling that value on TechCrunch:

One user told me that they nearly "stopped" using their phone during the day; they used to have it out and now they don't, period. That's insane when you think about how much the blue glow of smartphone screens has dominated our social interactions over the past decade.

You're in a meeting, an alert comes in about the next meeting being rescheduled, you glance at it and then go right back to listening. A call comes in, you're just finishing up at work, you answer right on your watch, exchange a few words, and then get back to getting out the door. You get home, drop your stuff, call out to Siri, and all your lights go into game mode. Then you feel a tap, and the watch tells you to get off your butt and get back into action. Then you feel a heartbeat on your wrist, and know you're being thought of, and won't be alone much longer. All without ever reaching for your iPhone.

I've argued convenience will be the Apple Watch's killer feature, but the way Matthew is saying makes it sound even more compelling.

If you argue the Watch isn't going to sell or do well, it's worth pointing out that here are very, very, very few products that allow you to hand someone cash and be given back TIME.