BioShock

BioShock arrives on iPhone and iPad, invites players back to the depths of Rapture

2K has released the classic action game BioShock on the Apple App Store, and it's now available for download on compatible iPhones and iPads. Much like the hit title released on last-gen consoles back in 2007, players are taken down to the depths of Rapture to relive the immersive experience and enjoy a seamless replay.

Since this is a mobile port, graphics quality has been taken down a notch and the size of the game is a whopping 2GB – so be sure to save some space by removing some other games you haven't played in some time. If you have yet to experience Rapture for yourself, we highly recommend grabbing it on your Apple devices and connecting a Bluetooth controller to really get started.

BioShock

Give it a download and let us know what you think in the comments.

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Rich Edmonds

Heads up the Mobile Nations Newsroom UK shift. An avid gamer, lover of all things technology and enjoys flying.

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Reader comments

BioShock arrives on iPhone and iPad, invites players back to the depths of Rapture

6 Comments

I'm in the medical pavilion. It's dark and there are voices surrounding me, punctuated by screams of terror. The worst part is, they're mine. The voice says, "why are you still playing this pixelated, low-res port?"

Is it because it's not so bad? Is it simply because it's Bioshock on your phone? Is it because you're hoping for a swift update from 2K that'll smooth things over and breathe back some life into the blood-spattered walls of Rapture? I don't honestly know...

The 2.6gb file size doesn't bother me. It's a feat given the original was over 8gb in size on mac. 2K have done a decent job of adding touch-controls and after 2hrs of play I can honestly say that they don't interfere with the ambiance - or what you can see of it. Some shadows are too dark and some screens are way too bright but I've seen worse.

The file size tells me that the devs couldn't go any smoother, even for the A7, and it shows the age of the game considerably. It would of been impressive on a 3GS, maybe. It's such a shame, when we see MC5 and Infinity Blade III and Real Racing etc make such light work of beautiful visuals.

Rapture is HUGE, but I would happily have accepted a 5GB file if it would of worked harder at lessening those jagged edges. Maybe with the rumoured 32,64 and 128gb iPhone 6s we'll see a nupdate soon.

Bioshock is one of the most beautiful games ever written. If you've never played it before, get it. If you're crap at FPS cos you keep dying, get it because it basically taught me how to shoot. But if you're revisiting Rapture and aren't bought over with the "wow! It's Bioshock... On an iPhone!!!" mentality, I fear disappointment is lurking over the horizon.

Sent from the iMore App

Wow...$15 for a 7 year old game that's had its graphics stripped down...I just picked this up in a Humble Bundle on computer for $1.

$15 is a crazy price gouge for this game, should be about $5 tops.

But this isn't for a computer, it's for the iPhone and iPad (which you could argue are also computers.) Complaining about price is exactly the reason we get so many horrible, wallet stealing freemium games in the App Store. Sure, you might not be impressed by this, but it's still a feat that a game of this magnitude can be played on a mobile phone.

It would be a feat if it were played in its original fidelity. As it stands though, it's just a thrown-together port IMO.

I would gladly pay top dollar for a AAA title that's designed from the ground-up for iOS. I do not, however, feel that a low-fidelity port is worth the same investment. X-Com Enemy Unknown is a great example of a game that at least had iOS in mind when it was being developed, and was well worth the original $20 sticker price.