Chrome for iOS and Mac

Everything you need to know about Google's Chrome browser for iPhone, iPad, and Mac

Everything you need to know about Google's Chrome browser for iPhone, iPad, and Mac

Chrome for Mac is Google's powerful, flexible browser originally based on Apple's open-source WebKit rendering engine, but now powered by Google's own Blink fork. It also has Google's powerful V8 JavaScript engine, and hooks into all of Google outstanding services, like Gmail, Maps, Google+, and more. On iPhone and iPad, it offers the same account sync, but due to Apple's security restrictions, has to use WebKit and the slower embedded JavaScript engine.

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Chrome for Android vs. Safari for iPhone: Browser shootout

Google has just released the too-long-in-coming Chrome for Android browser, and Phil from Android Central immediately loaded it up on his Galaxy Nexus, sought out an iPhone 4S running Safari, and put them head-to-head, rendering-time-to-rendering-time, in a classic Mobile Nations browser show down.

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Apple vs. Google ads: What are they selling?

Apple's latest ad wants you to buy a $500+ tablet computer that runs App Store apps. Apple wants to sell you shiny things to make money.

Google's latest ad wants you to store personal details about your child's life, from birth, on their servers. Google wants your data so they can sell it (aggregated and anonymized, of course) to others to make money.

Taken in that context, Apple's ad might be obnoxious and highly commercial, but Google's is downright creepy.

That's not an Apple fanboy perspective, that's a privacy fanboy perspective. And it's not iPhone vs. Android either. iPhone users use tons of Google services, including Gmail, Maps, and Search, and YouTube built in, and Voice, Latitude, etc. available via apps. Given over a 100 million iOS devices, we're a huge part of Google's user base, and a valuable part. And for the record, I haven't liked some of Apple's recent ads either.

But I do think about how each company makes money and what they have to sell to make that money. Apple makes almost all their money selling hardware products -- selling to you. Google makes almost all their money selling advertising -- selling you. (Or in this case, your child. Seriously.)

I'm not telling anyone to stop using Google, far from it. I'm a huge Google user myself. What I'm saying is this is not really a good ad.

(Note: As Apple ramps up iAds, this'll be a concern for iOS users as well.)

Both videos after the break.

UPDATE: Again, I'm a huge user of Google services -- this is not intended to scare anyone but simply to inform users, so users can make better informed decisions. Convenience and security are always at odds, and choosing the convenience of free cloud services like Google's sacrifices the security of your personal information. I currently find that an acceptable compromise. If you don't have a problem with it either, than good for you. Enjoy. As long as we all know the deal.

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Dear Google: removing H.264 support from Chrome is kinda evil

Google has recently announced that they're removing H.264 -- the video compression open standard used by everything from iPad and iPhone to YouTube and Netflix -- from their Chrome browser. Up until now Google has been the only company to support all the major video codecs, including H.264, OGG Theora, and their own, newly open-sourced WebM. Apple supports H.264, as does Microsoft, and Firefox supports only OGG Theora.

Why the sudden change? Some might say to hurt Apple, whose iOS and iTunes depend heavily on the technology and have shown no signs of slowing down even after Google decided to stop so much partnering and start much more competing with Apple directly in the mobile OS and media services space. Others might say it's simply to give Google a competitive advantage and push adoption of their own WebM format. Neither motives are mutually exclusive but again put the advancement of standards-based web technology on the back burner -- something Google once championed. (Hey, you know it's bad when Microsoft is chiding you over lack of standards support, okay?)

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Daily tip: How to send data from your desktop with Chrome to iPhone

Use Google's Chrome browser on your Mac or Windows PC and wish you could easily transfer data on to your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad? Well thanks to a Chrome Extension you can and we'll show you how after the break!

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TiPb TV 03: iPhone Case vs. Naked

Should you go around with a naked iPhone or do you need a case? If you do need a case, what kind should you get? That's a question we get asked all the time and it's the topic for the third episode of our new, conversational video podcast, TiPb TV.

Rene and I discuss the pros and cons of bare, barely there, and full on armor for iPhone 4. We also show off several of our favorite cases including the Case Mate Chrome and Ivy, the Incipio Ultra Light, the Golla Bag, the Otterbox Defender, and more.

We take on the argument of case vs. case vs. naked, the cost and benefits of protecting against the bumps and scratches of avoiding bulk. So if you've been trying to decide which type of case is best for you, or if you're daring to go bare with no case on at all, we'll help you make the best choice possible.

Watch along and then leave us a comment and tell us -- which case, if any, do you use?

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Case-Mate Barely There Chrome Case for iPhone 4 - accessory review

The Case-Mate Barely There Chrome Case for iPhone 4 is just stunningly beautiful. If you've been following me on Twitter you know it's my new favorite iPhone 4 case and considering how long I used the Case-Mate Barely There Chrome Case for my iPhone 3G it's likely to remain so for a long time to come.

But looks and personal preferences aren't everything -- hard to believe, I know! -- so check out the video above and keep reading after the jump to see how it performs.

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iPhone 4 Safari vs. Blackberry Torch 9800 WebKit -- Browser Battles

iPhone 4 vs. BlackBerry Torch 9800 vs Captivate browser test

CrackBerry Kevin decided to put the brand new BlackBerry Torch 9800's brand new BlackBerry OS 6 WebKit browser up against iPhone 4's iOS 4 Safari and Captivate's Android 2.1 Chrome in a good, old-fashioned browser battle royal.

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Case-Mate Barely There Chrome Case for the iPhone 3G

Say hello to the Case-Mate Barely There Chrome Case for the iPhone [$19.95 iMore Store Link]. It's a streamlined case with a chrome outer shell and a mirrored screen protector. And it's the hottest iPhone case to come around in a while.

If you haven’t already bought a gift for that special man/woman in your life, then just pick this one up. The perfectly mirrored surface is beautifully complimented by the gleaming chrome case. Yes, if Hercules had had this case he would have been able to defeat Medusa and make sure his hair still looked good. The back of the case also has a “beauty spot” for your apple icon (a hole in the case so you can see the apple logo). This case is such a stunner that it got a gasp of approval from one of my more difficult to please male friends.

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Google to Launch "Chrome" Open Source WebKit-based Browser

The intertubes are positively being flooded with what has to be some of the biggest browser news since Apple debuted MobileSafari on the iPhone: Google is getting in the game.

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