Hacked iPhone Bonus Round

Download Files on iPhone's MobileSafari

If you've hacked your iPhone, there are a few banner apps that popped up last night. The first app comes from a hacker by the name of Hachu, and it allows you to download files via MobileSafari on the iPhone directly. The initial release appears to support only zip and tar files, but if you're comfortable adding .plist files, the thread is chock full of different MIME declarations to allow the plugin to download many different files to your iPhone's /var/root/Downloads folder. One of the key things I've been missing about the iPhone! [image credit]

Foundation of Wi-Fi wireless sync for iPhone

The second app that is crazy useful if you've hacked your iPhone is iSync for iPhone by Francisios. If you've been hoping for wireless syncing with your iPhone, it's accomplished via rsync, a remote syncing protocol that's been around for quite a while and is very common and stable. The project is ambitious as evidenced by the project goals:

  • Synchronize iTunes library over Wi-Fi
  • Synchronize Photos over Wi-Fi
  • Synchronize Bookmarks, Contacts etc over Wi-Fi
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There are 26 comments. Add yours.

surur says:

They are all going to be so sad when Apple locks up the file system again in February....

Rene Ritchie says:

If by "sad" you mean "happy" and by "locks down" you mean "releases SDK", then agreed completely.
Being able to get signed apps via iTunes will be nice (even though I'm not sure how many, if any, I'd actually be interested in -- I ended up removing/not using most of 680s apps except for the Gx5 stuff which de-hideous'd the OS a tad...)

surur says:

If by "sad" you mean "happy" and by "locks down" you mean "releases SDK", then agreed completely.
Being able to get signed apps via iTunes will be nice (even though I'm not sure how many, if any, I'd actually be interested in -- I ended up removing/not using most of 680s apps except for the Gx5 stuff which de-hideous'd the OS a tad...)
Its virtually guaranteed that the iPhone SDK released by Apple will be more restrictive than what is available now.
Surur

archie says:

Sometimes... your comments make me laugh — because they are so uninformed.
Today though, they are wearing. This is surprising because I haven't read any of your bull**** for 5 months.

surur says:

Archie!!! You're back!!!
I've been waiting for you to come back so I could laugh at you!
Welcome back man!
Surur

Dieter Bohn says:

...take it easy, folks...

surur says:

So Archie, you've had your iPhone for 5 months now. Did you, umm... did you ever find the ...

Surur

Rene Ritchie says:

More restrictive than not restricted (ie not supported) is not necessarily a bad thing. Realistically (and apologies for inserting realism into a troll), come Feb., we'll have solid, signed apps that are officially supported for those with mainstream needs, and no doubt still a thriving hacker community still cat'n mousing their way through VoIP and other dark arts.

surur says:

... and no doubt still a thriving hacker community still cat'n mousing their way through VoIP and other dark arts.
Then Apple would have continued to fail to secure the iPhone. Need I remind you the last vulnerability allowed full remote access and control of the iPhone, all from simply visiting a website.
Surur

AnteL0pe says:

Were any iPhones maliciously attacked? Is there a rampant problem with iPhones getting compromised? Ummmmm, no. In fact there hasn't been a single reported incident.
Apple has a decent, but not stellar, track record of patching security vulnerabilities, certainly better than any other desktop OS manufacturer and I expect they will continue to lead the pack with the iPhone.

surur says:

Were any iPhones maliciously attacked? Is there a rampant problem with iPhones getting compromised? Ummmmm, no. In fact there hasn't been a single reported incident.
Apple has a decent, but not stellar, track record of patching security vulnerabilities, certainly better than any other desktop OS manufacturer and I expect they will continue to lead the pack with the iPhone.
Or alternatively no-one is interested? How many weeks did they leave this giant hole unpatched again? And was it not a hole which was patched on the desktop last year already?
The iPhone has been the first time Apple has been under determined attack (malicious or not) and the result has not been good. The confidence of rener that hackers will continue to have free rein of the iPhone tells you that much already.

Rene Ritchie says:

First, please don't ever misquote me (or even quote me, I am allergic to troll quotes).
Second, to paraphrase Sorkin: "No amount of digital control, lock down, or encryption technology can thwart some eager kid in Europe for writing to your metal".
The "unbreakable" Blu-Ray Java VM encryption was just broken by Slysoft. It's the nature of any gadget. It's why Microsoft bans Live accounts, Nintendo goes after Mod chip sellers, why Steve Gibson developed PPP, and the RIAA sues their own grandparents.
Somewhere, somewhen, some board kid in Scandinavia (not Jon, he's moved to Cali), will want to change his iPhone to all Techo-Viking, and he'll figure out a hack to do it.
Nature's rule, troll, not Apple's.

AnteL0pe says:

How has the result been "not good?" You're measuring open vulnerabilities in weeks? In a case where there was no malicious exploit, a vulnerability being open a few weeks is pretty good. Most vulnerabilities from other desktop OS manufacturers go unpatched for months, sometimes they aren't even acknowledged to exist for months. If Apple manages to patch every security issue in a matter of a couple weeks when no one is even attacking the vulnerability I'll be happy.

surur says:

If Apple manages to patch every security issue in a matter of a couple weeks when no one is even attacking the vulnerability I'll be happy.
You forget they baked a known and previously patched vulnerability into the iPhone in the first place. They should have patched it the next day, not 4 weeks later.
Surur

surur says:

First, I .. am allergic.. to .lock down,...
Why do you have an iPhone then?
Surur

AnteL0pe says:

What OS do you use that patches vulnerabilities the day after they've been made public? Was it a mistake to let a patched vulnerability in one product slip into another? Yes, but it isn't the end of the world and after the public made Apple aware of the issue it was patched on the next software release. There was obviously a mistake made when it slipped into release code, but having it removed on the very next release speaks to Apple's commitment to security.

Rene Ritchie says:

Took Palm a while to patch the security problem on the 680. Also, the problem with Palm patches is that after a hard-reset (which I had to do several times due to various issues, especially phone crashes/freezes), all the patches have to be reapplied (camera, exchange, security, etc. etc.)
iTunes updates for iPhone, thusfar, is a more elegant solution. (Although I'm not sure if a factory reset would put it to the last updated firmware, originally purchases firmware?)

archie says:

Was it a mistake to let a patched vulnerability in one product slip into another? Yes, but it isn't the end of the world and after the public made Apple aware of the issue it was patched on the next software release. There was obviously a mistake made when it slipped into release code, but having it removed on the very next release speaks to Apple's commitment to security.Don't let surur twist things on you.
The Safari ImageIO on the iPhone contained a version of libtiff that was vulnerable to a buffer overflow.
This was a different issue than the Safari WebKit which contained buffer overflows in the TIFF tag handling, the TIFF PixarLog decoder and the TIFF NeXT RLE decoder.
These are not the same thing.

archie says:

Or alternatively no-one is interested?Not sure where you have been but the iPhone now has a 27% of Smartphone market share here in the US (Frommer from Silicon Alley Insider). In the Urope it is outselling competitors phones something like 4 to 1 according to that UK CEO guy. Sounds about right. And Orange just released figures that reveal the iPhone is going much faster than anticipated there too. Business are taking to the iPhone in droves just like I said they would. I remember you disagreeing with me quite adamantly. Applications like NetSuite provide enterprise resource planning (ERP), Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and e-commerce solutions. SAP and its sales-force automation software is now available for the iPhone- AND, I might add that is available first on the iPhone with a BlackBerry version to follow in the coming months and maybe a Palm version. There are others but you get the point.
How many weeks did they leave this giant hole unpatched again? And was it not a hole which was patched on the desktop last year already?
The iPhone has been the first time Apple has been under determined attack (malicious or not) and the result has not been good. The confidence of rener that hackers will continue to have free rein of the iPhone tells you that much already.So you would like us to believe that the hacker community is wreaking havoc and destruction and terror on the iPhone community. hmmm...
Perhaps Apple's entry into the phone market has proven to be a good thing. :p You know, considering that even the hackers can do nothing but put their efforts towards good. I have not heard of one virus or underhanded act from an iPhone hacker yet.

archie says:

They are all going to be so sad when Apple locks up the file system again in February....
What?! What you are saying makes no sense.
I am sure you are unaware of this but I've been using a product called iPhone Disk for the last couple of months. It is a Google/Apple collaboration. It provides a MacFUSE based file system that lets you read and write files on your iPhone. NO HACKS REQUIRED. An actual desktop drop-in API that interfaces with the iPhone just like iTunes.
http://code.google.com/p/iphonedisk/
And don't you think having developers write apps for the iPhone will require access to the file system? OH!! WAIT!!! THATS RIGHT!
You believe that when Apple releases the SDK it will actually take away (restrict) the iPhones abilities.
Its virtually guaranteed that the iPhone SDK released by Apple will be more restrictive than what is available now.
Surur
Your such a troll. Go back to your home.

surur says:

So you would like us to believe that the hacker community is wreaking havoc and destruction and terror on the iPhone community. hmmm...
The hackers are not wreaking destruction on Apple iPhone users, but Apple's market plan, and Apple is looking pretty powerless to stop them.
What percentage of iPhone are unlocked again?
Surur

surur says:

Your such a troll. Go back to your home.
Archie, I just LOVE having you back.:D
Surur

archie says:

Tell me of this Apple market plan oh wise one.
You don't think that Apple is capable of putting the kabosh on these "destructive" hackers?
You don't get it. This hacking community is beneficial to the iPhone. This IS their marketing plan. Have you heard of Apple TV? Same thing.

archie says:

What percentage of iPhone are unlocked again?
Surur
20% but that is because they are sold that way.

surur says:

Tell me of this Apple market plan oh wise one.
The market plan where they get an extra $300-400 per buyer over the life of the phone contract? Dont follow Apple much, do you?
You don't think that Apple is capable of putting the kabosh on these "destructive" hackers?
Clearly not. Even Rener agrees Apple cant prevent hackers from opening up the iPhone.
As Rener said:
"No amount of digital control, lock down, or encryption technology can thwart some eager kid in Europe for writing to your metal".
You don't get it. This hacking community is beneficial to the iPhone. This IS their marketing plan. Have you heard of Apple TV? Same thing.
Thats hilarious. Yes, Apple intended this all along, didn't they :D :D :D :D :D
Surur

surur says:

20% but that is because they are sold that way.
:D :D :D :D :D :D
I did not know Apple actually fronted the iPhone Dev team. The things you learn on a message board. :D :D :D
See, thats why I LOVE having you back. You're such a barrel of laughs.
Surur