Not technically — but you should back up your library all the same.

Apple began rolling out iTunes Match features for those with Apple Music subscriptions earlier this year; since then, I've been asked a number of times whether users who previously subscribed to both iTunes Match and Apple Music needed to continue their $25/year subscription.

The answer: No! But it still pays to have a backup.

Why you don't need to pay for both services

When Apple Music first launched, the service boasted that in addition to the subscription catalog, you could listen to your personal music collection anywhere with iCloud Music Library. But unlike the company's iTunes Match service, tracks were matched with metadata only, and they were matched to the DRM-encumbered Apple Music catalog rather than the DRM-free iTunes Music catalog. This led to many issues with track matching as well as people panicking that Apple Music was DRM-locking their libraries.

This horrible situation is no more: Earlier this year, Apple Music switched to using iTunes Match's algorithm. Rather than using the DRM-laden Apple Music catalog to match your purchased and ripped tracks, it now uses the iTunes Store's DRM-free catalog.

While I still encourage everyone to have a full backup of their iTunes library before subscribing to any cloud service, this now means that even if you accidentally (or intentionally) delete your personal iTunes library on your main Mac, you'll be able to re-download copies of those songs that are DRM-free.

As a result, if you're paying for both Match and Apple Music, you're essentially double-paying for the same service.

Before you cancel, back up your music

I'm not kidding. Just because Apple's changed its matching algorithms doesn't mean things can't go wonky in the cloud. Don't risk your music collection: Make a complete, offline backup of your music library before turning off iTunes Match.

How to cancel iTunes Match

Once you've backed up your music, here's how to stop paying for iTunes Match.

Can I still use iTunes Match and not Apple Music?

Absolutely. If Apple Music's not your thing and you really only care about having your tracks on all your devices, you can 100 percent still use iTunes Match without Apple Music. Here's how:

I have other questions about iCloud Music Library!

Sounds like you need our full guide to using Apple's cloud music storage options! And feel free to ask questions in the comments, too.