Fund This: Impervious, an affordable spray-on waterproofing and scratch-resistant coating

Impervious waterproofing for iPhone

The funding campaign for Impervious is in the home stretch of offering affordable, easy-to-apply waterproofing and scratch protection for your iPhone. Users simply spray on and let dry. Apparently there's no residue left behind at all, assuming you follow the instructions. Each treatment is good for three years, though it uses up the whole $30 bottle.

Your iPhone's camera and speaker system are unaffected by the treatment as well. Though a complete internal and external application should provide submersion protection, the developers aren't suggesting it. In any case, an external application will protect against spills of all kinds.

The only viable consumer-grade aftermarket device waterproofing we've seen is from Liquipel, and they need you do ship in your device. Though it might feel a little sketchy doing this process on your own, and there's no way to know exactly how well Impervious works until you've bought it, applied it, and personally dunked it in a glass of water, the demo videos show treated iPhones working after a splash without a hitch. As with any waterproofing device or Kickstarter campaign, there's a little leap of faith to make before getting involved. Are you in? Hit up the Impervious Kickstarter page to get started.

Have something to say about this story? Share your comments below! Need help with something else? Submit your question!

Simon Sage

Editor-at-very-large at Mobile Nations, gamer, giant.

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Reader comments

Fund This: Impervious, an affordable spray-on waterproofing and scratch-resistant coating

7 Comments

You will have a hard time finding anything on earth worse for the environment than these types of spray on coatings. 3M Scotchguard is the analogous for clothing and it's horrible. I'm not even a tree-hugging freak and these types of coatings seem
Crazy to me.

I think it's interesting that they have a special iPhone 6 instruction video, I would love to see that one!

Sent from the iMore App

I know I'm negative, but if this product is going to cost $30 a bottle, and you have to use up the whole bottle by spraying--wait let's stop there. Do you have to open the cap and poor out excess just to make sure you've used to whole bottle?

Back to my opinion--if it's abundant and will "only" cost $30 a bottle, why aren't all phone waterproof already? This seems like a hell of a sell in an Apple store. (wait for it...)

You'll walk into your local Apple store and there will be a kiddy pool (or body of water) filled with iPhones, instead of the demos on the tables as they are now. Pull one out and try it out.

Clearly, the spray isn't that reliable.

Too little too late? For older phones, may be, but I can see problems with any coating over the ID scanner, and how does it affect sound quality after applying? Better off getting a waterproof case. I know accidents happen, but when at home I never go into the bathroom with the phone. In public it is in a locked case, and as dumb as this sounds, I never stand where the phone could drop into water. I rather it hit the floor, my case is fairly good at protecting the screen. This product looks like it will be "as see on tv" one day. But wait if you buy one bottle, we will give you a free carrying bag for just process and handling.

This product sounds like a scam to me. What they promise is good and very cheap but they don't give us any reasonable explanation (other than some pages with handwritten formulas that makes no sense!). The information about the product is poor and doubtful, plus I couldn't find any information about the members of the team, only a facebook page of the CEO which seems to be a fake profile:

https://www.facebook.com/justin.seimits

They promise the world to us (scratch resistant, water proof, environmental friendly, 100% transparent, bla bla bla) with no plausible explanation and no information about the research team. Very doubtful at least!