New iPad power indicator reportedly two hours too fast

Screenshot of an iPad charging

According to some recent reports, the new iPad battery level indicator seems to shows a full tank two hours and ten minutes before it's actually charged to full capacity. This news means, contrary to appearances, it really takes about 9 hours to get a full charge from scratch. The tests were run by DisplayMate, the fine folks that analyzed the display on the new iPad.

If accurate, this would be the second time an iOS indicator was found to be misreporting state. During the antennagate controversy, Apple admitted that the cellular signal indicator on the iPhone 4 was showing an erroneously high cell signals, and issued an update to fix it.

However, it seems that misreporting battery state is something that a lot of tablets actually suffer from, since the power status is figured out through an algorithm which can have flaws in it.

Despite having a higher-capacity battery, the new iPad's power adapter is the same as the iPad 2, so it's natural to expect charging to take longer; odds are most of us were going to be charging new iPads overnight anyway, when an extra two hours isn't going to make a huge difference.  

How much power does your iPad have before you plug it in at night? Will an extra two hours charging time throw off your routine with the new iPad?

Source: PCMag

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Editor-at-very-large at Mobile Nations, gamer, giant.

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Reader comments

New iPad power indicator reportedly two hours too fast

40 Comments

I'm usually around 30% but I only sleep 6-7 hours so if I'm ever on empty i won't have a full charge in the morning.

If it takes nine hours to charge, then that could be a problem for an overnight charge, as the average adult doesn't even get the 8 hours of sleep recommended.

So you're saying that there is a correlation between the "typical sleep time " and the 2-3 discrepancy on the new iPad? Do you seriously believe that the average person will use their iPad right until they fall asleep and start using it immediately upon getting up? You kidding, right?

I do not think that is the issue. A lot of people do not charge their iPad until they get in bed, and then they are off to work or school when they wake up. The heavy use throughout the day might kill the battery, yet they do not have 9 hours to charge it.

That's often how I use my current iPad. Heck I sleep with mine next to me on the bed most nights and use it first thing when I wake up to check email, read the news and so forth.
I rarely charge mine overnight, I usually plug it in to charge while I'm in the shower and having breakfast, etc. (it usually doesn't require a full charge). Will be interesting to see if the new one (which just departed HK enroute to me early next week, yippee!) creates a problem with overly long recharge requirements.

Yes, some people, many people actually, will use their iPads untill they fall asleep and right away as they wake up?
Want a scenario? Reading eBooks. You read a book until you fall asleep and you're going to continue to read it in the morning... on the... throne... so to speak.
Plus people love their iPads, they will use them as much as they can, at least in the beginning.

Actually....I do. I read a book on my iPad until I fall asleep, and usually check news, email, weather soon after waking.

Yeah, but you have to keep in mind that a 0% charge isn't going to be in sync with your bed time. It's not like if you go to bed at 9pm, that's the exact time the iPad will reach 0%. It's more likely that it will die during the even in which you would put it on charge well before bed time. So it should fully charge overnight unless you are too obsessed to put the thing down to charge when it dies and let it rest a bit.

The iPhone 4S does this, as well, although it only takes another 20 minutes or so to reach full carte after 100% is displayed. I don't think this is a mistake. The iPad is designed to do a trickle charge after it reaches 100%

I charge mine at night, also turning it off. Sleep at 12:30-1:00am to 7am, 100% in the morning. Turning it off seems to do the trick.

Even if your at 50% battery which is about 5 hours last, you would not want to not charge your device over sleep time, because if anything I learned, is that chargning it is a nightmare, I confused the iPhone cable with the iPad, and while using it, it doesn't charge, so i was stuck 3 hours at 19%.
It takes the whole night to charge up, so even when its > 30% you want your device fully charged at day. After all it's battery is supposed to not have memory charge, right?

this is why I bought a couple of the IPad 10W chargers, and use them with both my iPad and iPhone 4. Been doing that for the past 2 years and have had no battery issues yet with my iPhone

My 4S is doing that as well. When it's plugged in it shows as fully charged @ 100%, but when I unplug it, it drops to 96%. Could there be a bug in iOS 5.1?

The dropping immediately to 96% isn't normal, but it's not a bug. Do a full discharge/recharge and then see if it still happens. If so, do a restore. If it still happens call Apple.

If its jailbroken then it's just a fault in the jailbreak itself. I noticed that on my iPod running 5.1, however I would never jailbreak my 4S.

I have a Jailbroken 4S. It always charged to 100% and didn't drop to 96% as the OP said. But now I am on iOS 5.1 and it definitely drops to 96% immediately after unplugging my phone. It's got nothing to do with a jailbreak.

9 hours to charge the Ipad is crazy, and here I was testing the charging times to see how long it takes to charge.I was getting about 6 hours before it showed an full charge, maybe the next update will correct the battery meter.

I really wanted to see with medium use, no game playing, how long would the iPad last. I searched the web, downloaded more purchased apps, and read news articles. I took breaks, but kept the screen on. The brightness was a little less than 50%. I got a good 10 hours out of it, and had 14% left. Plugged it up to charge in sleep mode. Left the house WiFi on. And the iPad did a backup via iCloud. After 8.5 hours it was fully charged. Now if I was a heavy gamer, I am sure battery life would be less, I believe this will be the norm. Reference the battery indicator, my iPhone does the same. I agree with others, this may be a 5.1 issue.

Apple's suggestion is "change your sleeping pattern" 10 hours of sleep is much better because your new iPad will be fully charged :)

My old iPhone 4 (GSM), iPhone 4S, and original iPad all would get to 100% but still have the lighting icon for about 5-10 minutes. Then it would turn the the the plug icon. I haven't seen a "new iPad" in person yet, but I wonder if this "2 hours" is the time from 100% with lightening icon till the plug icon? And I wonder if that's two hours with the screen on?

This might be the most absurd discussion I've seen around here - and that's saying something.

Then your bar is too low. How a product operates or fails to is a fine topic of conversation on a website created for such things.

I have a question.
The iPhone charger is 5W charger and the iPad charger is 10W charger. Is it okay to charge my iPhone from my iPad charger or vise versa?

Haven't noticed how long the charge takes, but here's how you know it's completely charged:
The charger's brick is cool to the touch. Until it's done, the 10W brick is pretty warm.

The point of this article is that when the iPad3 displays 100%, it may not be fully charged. This would not be unlike Apple to gloss over a sticking point. The only way to verify this is to either put a current meter in the output of the charger or measure the A/C power drawn by the charger (e.g. plug the charger in to a Watt Meter). If they in fact show 100% on the iPad a full 2 hours before the charge rate drops, then that really smells like a shady claim. Lithium batteries are not like other chemistry batteries, they are charged to a very specific voltage (4.2V per cell) and then the charge is completely stopped, they are NEVER trickle charged. Apple did state that they stop charge, let the battery charge dip a little, then top off again, over and over. This is a good practice but does not really address a charge that continues a full two hours after the pad reads 100%
Apple could have made a 20watt charger and done it right. I think portable devices should charge in 1-4 hours max to allow users to keep their things up and running with less time tied up to a power outlet. I'm certainly no fan of a 9 hour full charge.

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Okay i have a newly purchased 16gb second generation ipod touch and i was sad that it didnt have a mic. i want to buy one. i saw the earphones with the mic on them and heard they dont work. do they ones from touchmic.com work??? i have hears some reviews they do and some they dont.

Thanks, this worked for me too. After the respring, the iBooks icon was still present, but it was deletable. After I deleted it, I reinstalled iBooks, and everything works.

You can set icons through HTML as well with "rel=apple-touch-icon" and by pointing the href to the png, do that per page and it should allow you to use different icons per page.

To be fair, the iPad is not a laptop replacement as it is quite inadequate to do much more than read the paper or play a game or two. Get a MacBook Air if you need to do work, it will blow the Windows 7 laptops out of the water.

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