After a decade and a half in mobile, Microsoft still comes out swinging.

Microsoft, the world's most famous software company, has gone all-in on hardware. At least that's the impression you get from their event. And credit where it's due: For anyone exhausted by the constant me-too devices from other vendors, like with the original Lumia and Surface, Microsoft is continuing to do interesting things. Whether they ultimately succeed or fail—and none of their devices have had an easy time of late—the ideas themselves are novel and can help move the market forward.

Yeah. There was some weird stuff. Having to install Silverlight to watch, in 2015? (And figure out how to turn off the Portuguese overdub on the U.S. stream?) Having to try and parse Panos Panay's "fragment, interrupt, repeat, reverse, repeat" speech pattern? Introducing the 2011 iPhone 4s antenna as a Lumia feature? Comparing a 2015 Surface Book to a 2012 MacBook Pro? Having to awkwardly try and position their products against Apple instead of the complacent Windows OEM partners who everyone knows is the real target?

I'm guessing the presentation will resonate with millennials, though, and in a way Microsoft might never have before. After more than a decade of Windows Mobile and Tablet PC, and half a decade of Lumia and Surface, watching Microsoft fight for relevance in the modern device market is inspiring. And you know what? I enjoyed the event more than any Google or Samsung event this year. (Would that Palm and BlackBerry had had the financial resources to keep battling as well.)

Here's the tech that was announced. Check it out, and all the coverage over at Windows Central, and then let me know what you think—anything Apple should be looking at for their phone, tablet, and computer lineups?