It's WWDC 2009. Steve or Phil or Scott or Joz or whomever is handling the heavy lifting for the iPhone 3.0 section and release-date announcement smiles and says -- "There's one more thing...

"Last year we showed you Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync support. Nobody expected it, but we were blown away by the reception. This year, we're announcing BlackBerry Connect support for the iPhone. With this, not only can you chat with your team over BlackBerry Messenger, but you can push data right from your Corporate BES. And to tell us more about it, ladies and gentlemen, here's CrackBerry Kevin the Co-CEO of Research in Motion--"

Sounds crazy, doesn't it? It does to me. I know it does to Kevin. No way in Hull (it's in Ontario -- look it up!) this happens, right? It's not like Apple would ever do business with a competitor such as RIM... or Microsoft... or Google...

Would Apple even want BlackBerry Connect -- a software layer that emulates varying amounts of BlackBerry functionality on other devices like Symbian, Palm, or Windows Mobile -- on the iPhone? They've certainly got some degree of business integration now with the aforementioned Microsoft ActiveSync. And from RIM's side, while they have licensed BlackBerry Connect in the past, it's not like they've been putting any emphasis on it in the present, have they?

Aside from letting iPhone users instachat more seamlessly with BlackBerry users -- dogs and cats living together, as Dieter would say -- is there anything really in it for consumers either? It wouldn't give the iPhone a keyboard or the BlackBerry the ability to run more than a handful of tiny, on-memory apps. And, instead of breaking down more proprietary communication protocols, it would just be extending PIN the way it's already extended ActiveSync.

Still, crazier things have happened. What if this did? Would you want it?