Fcc

T-Mobile wants better coverage inside your home and it's asking the FCC for help

T-Mobile wants its phones, tablets, and devices to work better in your homes and buildings, and to do so it is petitioning the FCC to make that happen. The Un-carrier wants to be able to buy more low-band spectrum to improve in-building coverage in the next FCC auction, and T-Mobile wants the FCC to alter a few rules to help it succeed.

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AT&T agrees to pay $105 million to settle claims of unauthorized third-party charges

AT&T has agreed to pay a total of $105 million to settle claims that the wireless carrier "billed customers millions of dollars in unauthorized third-party subscriptions and premium text messaging services."

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Crushed by a stampede of petitioners, the FCC extends net neutrality comment period

Crushed by a flood of commenters, the FCC has extended the open comment period for their Open Internet proceedings until Friday. When we wrote about the importance of net neutrality back in May, the FCC had opened the door for open comment, and that window was due to close today. But after having been smashed yesterday and today by people like you registering their thoughts with the FCC about how best to address net neutrality, the FCC has extended that window to Friday.

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FCC votes to limit AT&T, Verizon involvement in mid-2015 spectrum auction

Even with threats from AT&T and Verizon, the FCC has gone forward and voted in favor of previously-proposed restrictions on the 2015 spectrum auction that will offer up valuable low-band airwaves to wireless carriers. The restrictions put in place will reserve portions of the spectrum going up for auction for carriers that don't already have large chunks of low-band spectrum, largely cutting out AT&T and Verizon from participating in many markets.

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Tech giants blast FCC's net neutrality proposal

In an open letter to the Federal Communications Commission, major Internet and technology companies are united in their fight to keep the Internet free and open. Companies that include Amazon, Google, Microsoft, and Netflix among others (though Apple is noticeably absent), are standing together to fight the FCC's plans to split the Internet into faster and slower speed lanes as part of a new upcoming vote.

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Verizon pushes FCC to reconsider restrictions on upcoming spectrum auction

Verizon isn't taking too kindly to proposed regulations on an upcoming spectrum auction, and is hoping the FCC will change its ways before the sale opens next year. The auction, which will have extremely valuable 600MHz spectrum up for grabs in mid-2015, is expected to have restrictions imposed on it to limit big players like Verizon and AT&T from taking it all for themselves.

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FCC Speed Test review: Measure your iPhone and iPad network performance, help keep your carrier in check

The United States Federal Communications Commission has re-released their FCC Speed Test app for iPhone and iPad and iPad. It lets you directly measure upload, download, latency, and packet-loss over both cellular and Wi-Fi. You can also choose to anonymously submit information to the FCC about your results through the Measuring Broadband America program which aims to create transparency about actual network performance.

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FCC working to bring net neutrality back from the dead... but is it enough?

The Federal Communications Commission has announced its plan to craft new rules for net neutrality, following a defeat last month in federal court. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler highlighted a plan that greatly resembles the old rules, including provisions for transparency, as well as a prohibition on blocking and limiting traffic based on its source.

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Net neutrality overturned: Will Netflix have to pay your provider to stream your movies?

A three-judge federal appeals court on Tuesday in Washington D.C. overturned "net neutrality" rules implemented by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Those rules heretofore prevented internet access providers like Comcast and Verizon from favoring some types of information over another across their networks, according to GigaOM.

Updated with a statement from Comcast. Read on for details.

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FCC considers allowing in-flight calls as Department of Transportation considers banning them

The FCC may soon change their rules to allow passengers to make cellphone calls during flights, but they might still be banned if the Department of Transportation (USDOT) deems it necessary. While the FCC took steps yesterday that might allow cellphone use during flight, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced that USDOT will consider using their power to ban calls through the FAA. However, if even in the FAA does ban calls, it doesn't really reverse any decision by the FCC, according to POLITICO:

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