Jekyll Apps

Jekyll apps: How they attack iOS security and what you need to know about them

Today researchers Tielei Wang, Kangjie Lu, Long Lu, Simon Chung, and Wenke Lee from Georgia Tech gave a talk at the 22nd USENIX Security Symposium and revealed the details of how they got a so-called "Jekyll app" through the App Store approval process and into a position where it could perform malicious tasks. Their methods highlight several challenges to the effectiveness of the Apple's App Store review process as well as security in iOS. The researchers immediately pulled their app from the App Store after downloading it to their test devices, but demonstrated techniques that could be used by others to also sneak malware past Apple's reviewers.

The details of Apple's app review process are not publicly known, but aside from a few notable exceptions it has been largely successful in keeping malware away from iOS devices. The basic premise of a Jekyll app is to submit a seemingly harmless app to Apple for approval that, once published to the App Store, can be exploited to exhibit malicious behavior. The concept is fairly straightforward, but let's dig in to the details.

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Researchers sneak 'Jekyll app' malware into App Store, exploit their own code

Tielei Wang and his team of researchers at Georgia Tech have discovered a method for getting malicious iOS apps past Apple's App Store review process. The team created a "Jekyll app" that seemed harmless at first, but after making it into the App Store and onto devices, is able to have its code rearranged in order to perform potentially malicious tasks.

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