Nokia

Apple stealing ad revenue from Google and Microsoft

With the Launch of iAd by Apple many companies are choosing to advertise with them instead of Google or Microsoft. Businessweek.com reported that Apple may control as much as 21% of the market by the end of the year. Google will drop to 21% from last year’s holding of 27% and Microsoft, who was only just getting into ads, will drop to just 7% from last year’s 10%.

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iPhone: 3% market share vs. 39% profit share

iPhone has tiny market shall, monumental profit share according to Canaccord Genuity and IDC, and pretty much everyone else who's ever mentioned it. TiPb's been pointing this out for a long time of course, but boy does the above graphic make it visually apparent just what the difference is.

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Nokia goes after Apple (with words, not phones)

Nokia went after Apple today as part of their Nokia World event, taking issue with how Apple counts mobile devices (Nokia only counts phones), and how Apple SVP of iOS, Scott Forstall, appropriated Nokia's connecting people meme and dared to make it happy.

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Regarding Gartner saying Android market share will surpass iPhone

Gartner says global Android market share will surpass iPhone market share by 2011:

Gartner expects manufacturers such as Samsung to launch many new budget Android devices in 2H10 that will drive Android into mass market segments. Other players, such as Sony Ericsson, LG and Motorola, will follow a similar strategy. This trend should help Android become the top OS in North America by the end of 2010.

Android would remain second only to Nokia.

Totally unrelated link: iPhone is 3% of handset unit volume, 2x profit of RIM, Nokia, Sony combined. iPad next?

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iPhone is 3% of handset unit volume, 2x profit of RIM, Nokia, Sony combined. iPad next?

While iPhone accounts for only 3% of handset market share by unit volume, Finacial Times reveals some Goldman's numbers that show it's set to capture a stunning 2X the profit share of Nokia, RIM, and Sony -- combined.

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Apple adds Nokia N97 mini video to death-grip series

Apple has added the Nokia N97 mini to their (growing?) list of smartphones that suffer from the now-infamous "antennagate" death-grip. Here we see the N97 dropping from 7 to 3 bars.

Of course, iPhone 4 doesn't suffer from death-grip but death-touch, a single point of attenuation on the bottom left side. Apple made a trade-off for better overall reception and increased battery size at the expense of that single point of death-touch in low signal areas, but has since attempted to draw attention to the greater, industry-wide death-grip. (Though there's at least one video out, not from Apple, showing the new Samsung Galaxy S succumbing to a death-finger all its own.)

Meanwhile, David Chartier has started Don't Hold it Wrong, a log of similar videos as well as manuals where manufacturers point out attenuation areas on many different phones.

It's not surprising the whole "antennagate" hasn't faded away yet. It is a little surprising Apple's still adding to the attention. Video after the break.

Update: as commenters rightly point out, Apple didn't originally include Nokia on their antenna page but Nokia saw fit to make a statement about it, so now the collection has been rounded out.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in!]

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How Apple moved the conversation from iPhone 4 death-touch to industry-wide death-grip

One of the greatest tricks Apple pulled off at the iPhone 4 press conference was changing the dialog from death-touch -- a single point of antenna trouble on iPhone 4 -- to death-grip -- a device-wide point of antenna trouble faced by the entire industry.

Apple for their part did cop to making iPhone 4's point of attenuation very external and incredibly visible. Steve Jobs called it "x-marks the spot", but then Apple very quickly moved on from this death-touch to a wider death-grip and demonstrated it on handsets from RIM's BlackBerry to HTC's Droid to Samsung's Windows Mobile.

I initially thought this was a mistake on Apple's part -- that they were spending too much time deflecting onto the competition. Turns out I underestimated Apple, but not as badly as the competition. What Apple very neatly managed to do there was conflate their own widely reported iPhone 4 death-touch into the very real but widely under-reported death-grip phenomena that does indeed affect the entire industry.

What's more, by those very competitors responding that the death-grip either didn't affect their devices, was minimal at best, or wouldn't affect future devices, they cinched it for Apple. They became part of the problem. Why?

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CEOh-Snap iPad Attack Edition -- Google, Nokia, Microsoft, and Nintendo on Apple's Tablet

Prior to Steve Jobs laying into Google and Adobe, Google, Nokia, Microsoft, and Nintendo got their shots in on Apple and the iPad, and here's what they had to say:

  • Google CEO Eric Schmidt: "You might want to tell me the difference between a large phone and a tablet."

Someone might want to tell him people are making Android tablets, or is he still using BlackBerry?

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Apple: We're #1 Mobile Devices Company in World, Bigger than Sony, Samsung, Nokia

As part of their iPad keynote today, Apple took the opportunity to say that, with $15.6 billion in revenue last quarter, as $50 billion dollar company primarily focused on mobile devices (iPod, iPhone, MacBook), they were the #1 mobile device company in the world -- bigger by revenue than Sony, Samsung, and Nokia's mobile devices businesses.

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