The FCC took a strong step today in ensuring net neutrality. Verizon... threw a childish hissy fit in Morse Code.

If you hadn't heard, the FCC took a historic vote today to reclassify broadband Internet as a utility under Title II of the Communications Act. In plain speech, this gives the FCC the same rights to regulate Internet providers as it currently does phone companies. This also means that the FCC is now also allowed to impose those net neutrality rules it proposed earlier this month.

Now, even with today's events, the net neutrality fight is far from over: Undoubtedly there will be lawsuits and challenges from broadband companies to try and get the courts to overturn the FCC vote.

But the first shot across the bow of the FCC's Title II usage wasn't a subpoena or a lawsuit. Instead, someone at Verizon thought it would be just hilarious to deride the decision with a press release in dahs and dits.

I'm going to quote the entirety of Verizon's Morse Code diatribe, because it's just too absurd not to:

  • --- -.. .- -.-- .----. ... -.. . -.-. .. ... .. --- -. -... -.-- - .... . ..-. -.-. -.-. - --- . -. -.-. ..- -- -... . .-. -... .-. --- .- -.. -... .- -. -.. .. -. - . .-. -. . - ... . .-. ...- .. -.-. . ... .-- .. - .... -... .- -.. .-.. -.-- .- -. - .. --.- ..- .- - . -.. .-. . --. ..- .-.. .- - .. --- -. ... .. ... .- .-. .- -.. .. -.-. .- .-.. ... - . .--. - .... .- - .--. .-. . ... .- --. . ... .- - .. -- . --- ..-. ..- -. -.-. . .-. - .- .. -. - -.-- ..-. --- .-. -.-. --- -. ... ..- -- . .-. ... --..-- .. -. -. --- ...- .- - --- .-. ... .- -. -.. .. -. ...- . ... - --- .-. ... .-.-.- --- ...- . .-. - .... . .--. .- ... - - .-- --- -.. . -.-. .- -.. . ... .- -... .. .--. .- .-. - .. ... .- -. --..-- .-.. .. --. .... - -....- - --- ..- -.-. .... .--. --- .-.. .. -.-. -.-- .- .--. .--. .-. --- .- -.-. .... ..- -. .-.. . .- ... .... . -.. ..- -. .--. .-. . -.-. . -.. . -. - . -.. .. -. ...- . ... - -- . -. - .- -. -.. . -. .- -... .-.. . -.. - .... . -... .-. --- .- -.. -... .- -. -.. .. -. - . .-. -. . - .- --. . -.-. --- -. ... ..- -- . .-. ... -. --- .-- . -. .--- --- -.-- .-.-.- - .... . ..-. -.-. -.-. - --- -.. .- -.-- -.-. .... --- ... . - --- -.-. .... .- -. --. . - .... . .-- .- -.-- - .... . -.-. --- -- -- . .-. -.-. .. .- .-.. .. -. - . .-. -. . - .... .- ... --- .--. . .-. .- - . -.. ... .. -. -.-. . .. - ... -.-. .-. . .- - .. --- -. .-.-.- -.-. .... .- -. --. .. -. --. .- .--. .-.. .- - ..-. --- .-. -- - .... .- - .... .- ... -... . . -. ... --- ... ..- -.-. -.-. . ... ... ..-. ..- .-.. ... .... --- ..- .-.. -.. -... . -.. --- -. . --..-- .. ..-. .- - .- .-.. .-.. --..-- --- -. .-.. -.-- .- ..-. - . .-. -.-. .- .-. . ..-. ..- .-.. .--. --- .-.. .. -.-. -.-- .- -. .- .-.. -.-- ... .. ... --..-- ..-. ..- .-.. .-.. - .-. .- -. ... .--. .- .-. . -. -.-. -.-- --..-- .- -. -.. -... -.-- - .... . .-.. . --. .. ... .-.. .- - ..- .-. . --..-- .-- .... .. -.-. .... .. ... -.-. --- -. ... - .. - ..- - .. --- -. .- .-.. .-.. -.-- -.-. .... .- .-. --. . -.. .-- .. - .... -.. . - . .-. -- .. -. .. -. --. .--. --- .-.. .. -.-. -.-- .-.-.- .- ... .- .-. . ... ..- .-.. - --..-- .. - .. ... .-.. .. -.- . .-.. -.-- - .... .- - .... .. ... - --- .-. -.-- .-- .. .-.. .-.. .--- ..- -.. --. . - --- -.. .- -.-- .----. ... .- -.-. - .. --- -. ... .- ... -- .. ... --. ..- .. -.. . -.. .-.-.- - .... . ..-. -.-. -.-. .----. ... -- --- ...- . .. ... . ... .--. . -.-. .. .- .-.. .-.. -.-- .-. . --. .-. . - - .- -... .-.. . -... . -.-. .- ..- ... . .. - .. ... .-- .... --- .-.. .-.. -.-- ..- -. -. . -.-. . ... ... .- .-. -.-- .-.-.- - .... . ..-. -.-. -.-. .... .- -.. - .- .-. --. . - . -.. - --- --- .-.. ... .- ...- .- .. .-.. .- -... .-.. . - --- .--. .-. . ... . .-. ...- . .- -. --- .--. . -. .. -. - . .-. -. . - --..-- -... ..- - .. -. ... - . .- -.. -.-. .... --- ... . - --- ..- ... . - .... .. ... --- .-. -.. . .-. .- ... .- -. . -..- -.-. ..- ... . - --- .- -.. --- .--. - ...-- ----- ----- -....- .--. .-.. ..- ... .--. .- --. . ... --- ..-. -... .-. --- .- -.. .- -. -.. --- .--. . -. -....- . -. -.. . -.. .-. . --. ..- .-.. .- - --- .-. -.-- .- .-. -.-. .- -. .- - .... .- - .-- .. .-.. .-.. .... .- ...- . ..- -. .. -. - . -. -.. . -.. -. . --. .- - .. ...- . -.-. --- -. ... . --.- ..- . -. -.-. . ... ..-. --- .-. -.-. --- -. ... ..- -- . .-. ... .- -. -.. ...- .- .-. .. --- ..- ... .--. .- .-. - ... --- ..-. - .... . .. -. - . .-. -. . - . -.-. --- ... -.-- ... - . -- ..-. --- .-. -.-- . .- .-. ... - --- -.-. --- -- . .-.-.- .-- .... .- - .... .- ... -... . . -. .- -. -.. .-- .. .-.. .-.. .-. . -- .- .. -. -.-. --- -. ... - .- -. - -... . ..-. --- .-. . --..-- -.. ..- .-. .. -. --. .- -. -.. .- ..-. - . .-. - .... . . -..- .. ... - . -. -.-. . --- ..-. .- -. -.-- .-. . --. ..- .-.. .- - .. --- -. ... .. ... ...- . .-. .. --.. --- -. .----. ... -.-. --- -- -- .. - -- . -. - - --- .- -. --- .--. . -. .. -. - . .-. -. . - - .... .- - .--. .-. --- ...- .. -.. . ... -.-. --- -. ... ..- -- . .-. ... .-- .. - .... -.-. --- -- .--. . - .. - .. ...- . -... .-. --- .- -.. -... .- -. -.. -.-. .... --- .. -.-. . ... .- -. -.. .. -. - . .-. -. . - .- -.-. -.-. . ... ... .-- .... . -. --..-- .-- .... . .-. . --..-- .- -. -.. .... --- .-- - .... . -.-- .-- .- -. - .-.-.-

Titled "FCC's 'Throwback Thursday' Move Imposes 1930s Rules on the Internet," perhaps Verizon thought the company would be a little cheeky with its press release by using a language that was, for the record, invented far before 1930, and is still in use today by ham radio operators and puzzle-solvers around the world.

Of course, why Verizon chose Morse is beyond me: By 1930, both the telephone and telegraph were widely used in households across the country. And given that the switching stations behind the telegraph would eventually give birth to packet switching and the early days of the Internet, it seems to me that Verizon might have had a far more prudent protest in creating a faux telegram.

Of course, that would have required about a third of the whining words the company chose to include in its message.

But you know, perhaps Verizon realized that history enthusiasts might take umbrage with their inappropriate Morse Code usage and came up with a secondary joke. You see, the "21st century" translation linked below that wall of dits and dahs happens to be a PDF with the date "February 26th, 1934;" It's also largely printed in a muddled font designed to look like, I can only assume, some sad typewriter that hadn't had its letters cleaned of crusty ink in thirty years. Because nothing screams "professional business" like a poorly typeset press release. (Not to mention, as my friend and typography expert Glenn Fleishmann pointed out, italic-set typewriters were practically non-existent in the 1930s; you'd have to have purchased a specific model solely for italic type.)

Why is the release dated 1934? Well, it seems that the company is implying that the Federal Communications Commission Act, passed in that same year, is far too outdated to serve as appropriate regulation for 2015.

Except, funny story, Verizon: The Federal Communications Commission Act was passed in June of 1934, becoming fully effective in July. Your February 1934 press release is complaining about a law that hasn't even been passed yet, just as you're complaining about net neutrality rules that haven't yet gone into effect.

Do you perhaps have valid points hidden within its double mockery of a press release? Sure, it's possible. But from one longtime Internet denizen to another, Verizon, a tip: If you're going to troll the Internet, at least bother to get your dates and facts right first.