Html 5

Netflix brings HTML5 streaming to OS X Yosemite's Safari

Netflix continues to get rid of using Microsoft's Silverlight video player in its web browser versions. Today, the streaming video company announced that, starting with the version of Safari in Apple's OS X 10.10 Yosemite, it will move over to HTML5.

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Stock Talk 02: Apple value, RIM results, Android uptake

Chris, Ed, and Rene talk Apple value, RIM's latest results, the uptake of Android, webOS going open source, Microsoft's mobile chances, HTML5 platforms, the future of LTE, and the year ahead. This is Mobile Nations Stock Talk.

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Adobe confirms Flash Player mobile is dead

Danny Winokur, VP and GM, interactive development at Adobe, confirms earlier rumors that Flash Player mobile is getting scrapped.

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Rumor: Adobe to cancel mobile Flash Player, go all in on Air and HTML 5

ZDNet, citing developers who'd been briefed on the plans, claims Adobe is getting ready to pull the plug on mobile Flash Player for Android and BlackBerry Playbook.

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Google Music now available for iPhone and iPad as an HTML 5 web app

Google has announced via twitter that it now has an HTML 5 iOS optimized web app for its Google Music service. Google Music is currently a beta only service available solely in the U.S. If you already have an account, you can try it out and get access to all your content in this well designed web app. The web app works on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch running iOS 4.

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Dear Google: removing H.264 support from Chrome is kinda evil

Google has recently announced that they're removing H.264 -- the video compression open standard used by everything from iPad and iPhone to YouTube and Netflix -- from their Chrome browser. Up until now Google has been the only company to support all the major video codecs, including H.264, OGG Theora, and their own, newly open-sourced WebM. Apple supports H.264, as does Microsoft, and Firefox supports only OGG Theora.

Why the sudden change? Some might say to hurt Apple, whose iOS and iTunes depend heavily on the technology and have shown no signs of slowing down even after Google decided to stop so much partnering and start much more competing with Apple directly in the mobile OS and media services space. Others might say it's simply to give Google a competitive advantage and push adoption of their own WebM format. Neither motives are mutually exclusive but again put the advancement of standards-based web technology on the back burner -- something Google once championed. (Hey, you know it's bad when Microsoft is chiding you over lack of standards support, okay?)

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iPhone, iPad friendly HTML 5 video penetration hits 54%

A new reports suggest that 54% of all video online is now HTML5 compatible (mostly H.264), which means it's iPad, iPhone and iPod touch compatible as well. Here are some of the discoveries from MeFeedia:

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H.264 goes royalty-free, web to go H.264?

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Could HTML 5 Kill Flash on the iPhone?

Well, at least kill the need for Flash on the iPhone? Daring Fireball says a simple "yes" to Yahoo! Tech's question.

The idea is that a standards based technology, open and broadly used, could make redundant proprietary and sometimes bloated and buggy plugins like Adobe Flash, Microsoft Silverlight, and Sun JavaFX.

Apple's Safari, including Mobile Safari on the iPhone, and Mozilla Firefox are already supporting HTML5 features. Microsoft's Internet Explorer -- so far -- isn't.

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