Piracy

Apple removes apps with music download capabilities from its App Store

It appears as though Apple is removing apps that support the downloading of music from its App Store. It's an interesting move for the company, going as far as implementing a iTunes Radio banner, which is displayed when a search for 'music download' is carried out on the store. Removing said apps, including those that tap into third-party file sharing website, will surely pave the way for Apple to push through its iTunes music services.

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Stealing in-app purchases and what it could cost you

There's a story going around today about a new hack that appears to allow users to bypass iTunes and steal in-app purchases "for free". I put "for free" in quotation marks because, as Ally pointed out in her editorial on app theft, there's no such thing as free. This time, however, the cost could be something more than money. The way I understand it, the hack in question uses a proxy, requires you to install a bogus certificate, and change DNS settings. That allows the transaction to be intercepted before it reaches iTunes, and that's what lets it cheat developers out of payment. It's also what could let the hacker collect all your information instead.

And that's dangerous.

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Jailbreak, app piracy, and the true cost of theft

Now that the iOS 5.1.1 jailbreak is available for the iPhone 4S, new iPad, and older devices, the subject of jailbreak in general is getting a lot of attention again, and with it, the dark side of jailbreaking. It seems whenever someone wants to attack the very concept of jailbreak, one of the first salvos unleashed is app piracy. The sad, ugly truth is that those attacks are made possible because some people who jailbreak do so mainly or entirely to get "free" apps. And the sadder, uglier truth is that there's no such thing as "free". Everything has a cost. Even and especially theft.

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Angry Birds boss doesn't see app piracy as a problem - it might even help business

In a recent interview, Rovio CEO Mikael Hed said that app piracy isn't a huge threat to their signature title, Angry Birds. In fact, it may help increase their popularity. Hed draws a lot of parallels to the music industry, and sees suing your fanbase as fundamentally "futile".

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Porting Siri to other iOS devices requires piracy, likely won't be a reality

iPhone Dev-Team member MuscleNerd has gone on the record stating a port of Siri to other iOS devices outside of the new iPhone 4S will require piracy, and likely won't ever see the light of day as a consequence.

Anyone hoping for a "port" of Siri from iPhone4S: pending a very low-level A5 exploit, it likely can't be done without piracy

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iPhone App Piracy is Out of Control

Piracy exists in many different media platforms - movies, music, books, video games and yes, even iPhone applications. Exactly how big is iPhone application piracy to date? According to 24/7 Wall Street, the App Store has lost over $450 million since it's inception.

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Apple Closed Jailbreak Exploit Due to App Piracy?

Did Apple close the 24kpwn exploit in the latest shipments of the iPhone 3GS due to app piracy? MobileCrunch thinks it's certainly a factor:

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Apple Faces Off Against the EFF in Jailbreak Showdown

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App Store Anarchy - Pirated iPhone Applications

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$200 iTunes Gift Cards on Sale for $2.60 (Ok, Not Really...)

Ok, well Apple is really not selling $200 iTunes gift cards for only $2.60 so keep dreaming. But according to Music Ally Chinese "pirates" have hacked the algorithm that generates the iTunes gift cards and so now fake cards are flooding the market for as low as $2.60 in China. When we say flooding we literally mean flooding the Chinese market:

Apparently six months ago, a $200 card went for around 320 RMB (roughly $47), but the price has since plummeted to around 18 RMB ($2.60) as more sellers pile in.

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