In Short

The iPod classic can hold 40,000 songs or 200 hours of video and has 36 hours of battery life. It can store photos, and play extremely limited, classic iPod games. It requires a tethered connection to a Windows or Mac PC running iTunes to transfer audio files and playlists. It also has a small screen and doesn't run iOS so can't run apps or games from the App Store. If you're a serious audiophile with serious audio collection, and want all of it in your pocket, get the iPod classic. Apple stopped making the iPod classic in 2014, but it remains beloved among iPod enthusiasts for its huge capacity and vintage design.

The iPod classic is most reminiscent of the original iPod — hence the "classic" moniker. The rectangular music player sports a 320 x 240 pixel color LCD display, Click Wheel interface, and has 160 GB of internal storage. It's priced at $249.

The iPod classic uses a 30-pin Dock Connector interface to connect to a host Mac or PC running iTunes, which is the only way of downloading music to the device — it lacks Bluetooth or Wi-Fi connectivity.

The iPod classic runs its own operating system — it's not iOS, so you can't load apps from the App Store onto it, only music, movies and TV shows.

But enough about what the iPod classic can't do. The iPod classic was the only iPod that didn't use solid state storage - instead, it's got a tiny 1.8-inch hard disk drive.

The 160 GB hard drive can store 40,000 songs, 200 hours of video, or 25,000 photos. The iPod classic's battery life is estimated at 36 hours of use per charge. For a time Apple even offered games that you could download and play on the iPod classic, though those were discontinued in late 2011.

The iPod classic was available in two sizes, black and silver. The enclosure is made of anodized aluminum and polished stainless steel.

Apple stopped making the iPod classic in 2014, indicating it could no longer get the parts needed to make the device.