Nsa

Angry Birds' Rovio angrily denies charges of NSA snooping

Rovio has said that it does not share data with intelligence agencies, as new data has emerged that both the American NSA and British GCHQ collect data from Angry Birds players. However, while Rovio might not give data to these agencies themeselves, player data still might be gathered through their games.

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DOJ loosens gag order, Apple issues update on NSA requests

On Monday evening the U.S. Department of Justice announced it was loosening restrictions on what details tech companies can disclose about government data requests - an area that Tim Cook spoke out against as recently as this afternoon, during Apple's conference call with analysts.

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Tim Cook talks sapphire glass, iRing, gag orders, and how the NSA would have to cart Apple out in boxes...

Tim Cook's segment on ABC news aired last night. Ostensibly about the 30th birthday of the Mac, most of the time was spent on more sensational (and serious) subjects:

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Apple claims no knowledge of DROPOUTJEEP, will protect customer data from any and all attacks, regardless of who's behind them

Apple has commented on the DROPOUTJEEP program, which a security researcher claimed let the NSA and similar government agencies compromise iOS devices, enable cameras and mics, and track data with a "100% success" rate. Matthew Panzarino from TechCrunch got the statement:

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Vector 25: Top tech stories of 2013!

Georgia Dow of ZEN & TECH joins Rene to talk about the top technology stories of 2013, including revelations about government surveillance, social networks and the mob mentality, boredom vs. change aversion, and the internet of things.

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The NSA eavesdrops on the iPhone with ease, says security researcher

Security researcher Jacob Appelbaum claims to have discovered what he describes as "an iPhone backdoor" exploited by the National Security Agency (NSA). Appelbaum discussed the exploit during a speech he gave at this week's Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg, Germany, according to The Daily Dot.

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RSA refutes 'secret contract' deal with NSA

RSA has been essential to corporate security for years - developers of trusted cryptography techniques that serve as the lynchpin to corporate data security. Now the company - presently owned by enterprise data company EMC Corp. - is under fire following allegations it was paid by the National Security Agency (NSA) to promote the use of flawed encryption technology.

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If you were Tim Cook, about to meet U.S. President Obama to talk NSA spying and the Obamacare website, what would you say?

Tim Cook and other tech execs are expected to meet with U.S. President Barack Obama to discuss, among other things, NSA spying and the Obamacare website. Zeke J Miller, writing for Time:

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Judge rules NSA phone data-mining unconstitutional

U.S. District Judge Richard Leon ruled Monday that the National Security Agency's (NSA's) collection of domestic phone record metadata is unconstitutional. The judge isn't enforcing his order, however, because the government is expected to appeal the ruling, according to Politico.

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Thanks to outdated encryption, NSA, other security agencies, can reportedly intercept private cellphone calls and texts

We've know for a while that the A5/1 encryption used by most carriers is vulnerable to exploitation, especially since they seemed not to care at all about its vulnerabilities, but now it looks like the system has been cracked to the extent that the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA), and presumably other intelligence agencies around the world, can listen in on and read our private conversations and text transmissions. The Washington Post:

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