Ibooks

Shocking! Repetitive! Higher iTunes Music Prices Slowed Sales

When iTunes Music went DRM-free and "hits" jumped from $0.99 to $1.29 stories soon followed that the higher price point was leading to slower sales... and now that iBooks and publishers aim to increase eBook sales from $9.99 to up to $14.99, MediaMemo is telling them to "beware!":

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Major Textbook Publishers Sign with ScrollMotion to get on iPad

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that publishers, McGraw-Hill Cos, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt K-12, Pearson Education, and Kaplan Inc., have signed with ScrollMotion to adapt their textbooks for Apple's new iPad tablet.

Though Apple didn't outline its strategy to target the educational sector with its iPad last week, people familiar with Apple's thinking have said that the iPad's use in schools was one of the focal points of discussions in developing the product. In its exploration of electronic book technology, it thought particularly about how it could re-invent textbooks, these people said. Apple declined to comment on the role of textbooks on the iPad. Apple has an edge in the educational sector becauseits Macintosh computers have always enjoyed a strong following in the academic sphere, and it already offers educational audio and video content through its iTunes U service.

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Macmillan Books to Return to Amazon, Prices to Rise to iPad iBooks Level, Consumers to Vote with their Wallets

Both Mcmillan and Amazon have issued statements about the story linked to previously, wherein they stopped selling Macmillan e-books after the publisher wanted to raise the price for best-sellers to an agency model $12.99 to $14.99 -- which Apple had already agreed to for iBooks on the iPad.

Mcmillan's CEO, John Sargent's comments ran as a paid advertisement in the Sunday edition of PublishersLunch and read in part:

Under the agency model, we will sell the digital editions of our books to consumers through our retailers. Our retailers will act as our agents and will take a 30% commission (the standard split today for many digital media businesses). The price will be set the price for each book individually. Our plan is to price the digital edition of most adult trade books in a price range from $14.99 to $5.99. At first release, concurrent with a hardcover, most titles will be priced between $14.99 and $12.99. E books will almost always appear day on date with the physical edition. Pricing will be dynamic over time.

The agency model would allow Amazon to make more money selling our books, not less. We would make less money in our dealings with Amazon under the new model. Our disagreement is not about short-term profitability but rather about the long-term viability and stability of the digital book market.

Amazon's response can be found in full on Engadget, but contains:

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Apple vs. Amazon vs. Macmillian -- Begun These e-Book Wars Have?

According to the NYT's Bits blog, Amazon has pulled Macmillan e-books due to a dispute over pricing, with Amazon wanting to hold the line at $9.99 and Macmillan wanting to raise it to an Apple iPad iBooks-like $14.99.

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Apple iBooks App to be US-only at Launch? What About iPhone-also?

Stop us if you've heard this one before -- Apple rolls out a new form of media, like say iBooks e-books, for their iTunes/iPod/iPhone/now iPad ecosystem, and it's initially only available in the US.

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Apple Introduces iBooks Apps -- Stands on Amazon's Shoulders!

As part of their iPad announcement today, Apple introduced a new app called iBooks (hey, there's that old name!) which they said stands on the shoulders of Amazon to go a little further.

The initial GUI looks a lot like the iPhone ebook app Classics [iTunes link]. As rumored, $14.99 for a new "hardcover" book is the selling price.

You can tap to change pages or swipe, and readers can choose their own font and size from a small list including Baskerville, Cochin, Palatino, Times, and Verdana.

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