john siracusa

Debug 49: John Siracusa, round 2

Debug is a casual, conversational interview show featuring the best developers in the business about the amazing apps they make and why and how they make them. On this episode — Fresh from his review of OS X Yosemite, John Siracusa returns to talk interface, vibrancy, and a whole lot of Swift.

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Debug 32: John Siracusa on Copland 2014

John Siracusa of Hypercritical and the Accidental Tech Podcast shows up to fight with Guy over Copland 2014. That is, the idea that Apple needs to embrace elements of higher level languages and figure out what comes after Objective C.

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Debug 24.1: Jalkut, Nielsen, Siracusa on OS X. Still.

Daniel Jalkut, Ryan Nielsen, and John Siracusa join Guy and Rene to talk about OS X Mavericks and the future of the Mac, continuing with interface, scripting, and more. (Part 2 of 2.)

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Debug 24: Jalkut, Nielsen, Siracusa and the future OS X

Daniel Jalkut, Ryan Nielsen, and John Siracusa join Guy and Rene to talk about OS X Mavericks and the future of the Mac, starting with free updates and file systems. (Part 1 of 2.)

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OS X Mavericks Finder Tags: Why they work the way they do

One of several new, pro-user friendly new features in OS X Mavericks is Finder Tags. On the surface, they work like any other tagging system, allowing you to categorize and later find files by association. But they also have quirks and oddities all their own. The reason for that can be found in how OS X handles metadata, both now and in the past. John Siracusa explains it like only John Siracusa can. Ars Technica:

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Adding dependency to Apple

Apple, given their history, is acutely aware of the pain that can result when their destiny depends on companies outside their control. Microsoft, Adobe, Google, Hollywood, AT&T, Nuance, and the list goes on. In yet another thoughtful piece on his blog, Hypercritical, John Siracusa argues that despite all this, Apple might do well to consider a few more dependencies.

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The rise of WebKit browsers, and the fear of IE6-style stagnation

Now that Opera has announced they'll be switching from their Presto HTML rendering engine to WebKit, the open source engine rendering engine Apple forked from KHTML, there's been some concern that having such a dominant technology could one again lead to the type of browser stagnation we suffered under Microsoft and Internet Explorer 6 (IE6). Indeed, Safari on iOS and OS X, Google's Chrome, Palm's webOS, BlackBerry's Torch, and others have all based themselves on WebKit. Writing on Hypercritical, however, John Siracusa thinks the parallel doesn't hold:

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