How do weighted blankets like the Gravity Blanket work?

How do weighted blankets like the Gravity Blanket work?

Best answer: Weighted blankets are filled with weighted beads or pellets that help create a heavy feeling of being hugged or cuddled. They're said to reduce anxiety and help you sleep more soundly.Amazon: YnM weighted blanket (opens in new tab) ($70)Amazon: Gravity Blanket (opens in new tab) ($240)

A heavy blanket feels like a hug

Based on studies, like this one in the Journal of Sleep Medicine and Disorders, weighted blankets have been shown to improve sleep in people with anxiety-, PTSD-, autism-, and ADHD-induced insomnia. The heavy blanket tricks your brain into thinking you're being cuddled, which in turn activates parts of your brain and nervous system that are active in times of low stress.

The weight of the blanket has a calming effect on you both psychologically and physically since it prevents you from tossing and turning as much throughout the night.

While they're more expensive than a normal blanket, their popularity proves that sometimes money isn't an option for the possibility of a better night's sleep. The Gravity Blanket, which is arguably the most well known of these, is super expensive, but luckily, there are cheaper options.

No, you're not trapped under a weighted blanket

While weighted blankets make it more difficult to toss and turn, you're certainly not trapped or restrained under one. These blankets come in various weights, and it's generally recommended that you buy one that's roughly 10 percent of your body weight. So people who weigh between 100 and 170 pounds should grab a 15-pound blanket, while heavier folks should go with a 20-pound blanket, and so on.

Precautions

If you snore heavily or have sleep apnea (or any sign thereof), you should not use a weighted blanket. The added weight may restrict airflow, which will make for a much worse sleep (or cause your health problems to worsen). If you're unsure, consult your doctor before buying a weighted blanket.

Mick is a staff writer who's as frugal as they come, so he always does extensive research (much to the exhaustion of his wife) before making a purchase. If it's not worth the price, Mick ain't buying.