Security

'Thunderstrike' attack also fixed in OS X 10.10.2

"Thunderstrike" is the name for an attack that can target Mac hardware via the Thunderbolt port. Apple had previously updated the Retina 5K iMac and 2014 Mac mini to partially secure them against Thunderstrike. Now, the upcoming OS X Yosemite 10.10.2 will fix the problem for all recent Macs running Yosemite.

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How to control which iPhone and iPad apps can access your Twitter and Facebook accounts

We use Facebook and Twitter for more than just talking with our virtual social communities these days. We use them to login to other sites, to comment, to register — to host our digital identity. That's why it's a good idea to check and control which iPhone and iPad apps have access to your Facebook and Twitter accounts. The best part is you don't even have to log in to Facebook or Twitter on the web. You can do it right from your iPhone or iPad!

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Latest OS X 10.10.2 beta kills Google-disclosed vulnerabilities dead

Google's Project Zero research program has disclosed and released proof-of-concept code for a series of 0day — previously unknown — vulnerabilities found in Apple's OS X operating system for the Mac. These exploits are all fixed in OS X Yosemite 10.10.2, now in beta.

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Things you don't need to worry about: Snowden doesn't use an iPhone, says his lawyer

There's a story going around that quotes NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden's lawyer as saying Snowden won't use an iPhone because it has "special software" that could gather information about him. Instead, the lawyer says, Snowden has a simple phone". There's no first-hand account from Snowden and no details about what the "special software" might be — a web cookie? who knows! — but that hasn't stopped the quote from making its way across the sensationalism-over-security parts of the internet. So, what's really going?

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Yosemite Spotlight, spam email, tracking pixels, and what you need to know

By default, OS X Yosemite's Mail app won't "load remote content" such as the types of images typically requested by marketing emails and spam. You can change that in preferences if you really want to see remote images in your emails — such as the products being advertised by Apple, Best Buy, or other retailers in their mailings — but if you accidentally or deliberately click on spam, those images will load too. Even with "load remote content" left off, however, if any such marketing or spam email shows up as a Spotlight search result, Heisse reports that such remote content will load. So, what's going on and what can you do about it?

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Cellular voice and SMS can reportedly be listened in on, FaceTime and iMessage safe

Security researchers in Germany have reportedly discovered two ways to both capture and decrypt voice and SMS communications that travel over SS7, a set of protocols used by phone systems.

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How to open apps from an unidentified developer in Yosemite

Mac OS X has a couple of great safeguards in place to prevent you from accidentally running malicious applications that might infect or otherwise damage your computer. But that can occasionally also prevent perfectly legitimate applications from running.

Here's how to keep your computer safe and also have the option to open certain software on a case-by-case basis.

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Apple entering era of security fear-mongering... from security vendors

Apple is "entering a whack-a-mole era" when it comes to enterprise security, according to Marble Security, a company that — wait for it! — wants to sell enterprise on additional security products. Sadly, their marketing-masquerading-as-threat-assessment is being passed along as reporting, and that does a profound disservice to people who need to be informed and empowered, not manipulated and scared. So, what's really going on with Apple and security?

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How Apple keeps AirDrop files private and secure

AirDrop, part of Apple's Continuity features, makes it easy to share files between your iPhone, iPad, and/or Mac. It's especially useful for files that are larger than Messages or Mail can comfortably handle, and for situations where you want to transfer directly, without any information going over the internet. You have to be within range of Bluetooth Low Energy (BT LE), and have Wi-Fi enabled to handle the actual data, but when you do, AirDrop makes it simple and easy to share any file from OS X, and almost anything that can call up a Share Sheet on iOS. Best of all, AirDrop keeps your files private and secure.

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How Apple keeps your SMS/MMS and call relays private and secure

With Continuity you can relay your SMS/MMS and calls from your iPhone to your iPad or Mac. That means, if your iPhone isn't close by, you don't have to go running for it just to take or make a text or call. As long as you have an iPhone and are logged into the same Apple ID on all your devices, you can do both right from your iPad and iPad. It's not only easy to do, it's private and secure.

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