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Security

USB-C and BadUSB attacks: What you need to know

Apple announced the new MacBook with USB-C connector last Monday and already headlines are appearing linking it to known security issues, like BadUSB.

BadUSB is an attack that uses the way computers interface with the universal serial bus (USB) standard to try and load malware onto the machine. It's a longstanding issue with USB in general, and nothing specific to Apple or the MacBook's implementation of USB-C. Throwing Apple and a hot new product under the headline bus is a great way to get attention, but what's really going on?

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How secure is the Apple Watch?

That was a question posed by MarketWatch today. It's also an important question. Unfortunately, MarketWatch didn't treat the question that way. And that's a profound disservice to its readers.

The Apple Watch is, by Apple's own admission the most personal, most intimate device the company has ever released. It tracks health, it handles communications, it can control our homes, it can pay for our purchases. Security on the Apple Watch is something that's going to matter to everyone who uses it. The response to the sensational headline used by MarketWatch, is that they don't know. And the follow up is pure fear, uncertainty, and doubt. That's not only bad journalism, it's an actively harmful attack.

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CIA program sought to compromise security of Apple devices

More information has come to light on government surveillance, with new information revealing a campaign by the CIA to break through the security of Apple devices.

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How to manage two-factor authentication on your iPhone, iPad, and Mac with Authy

Passwords are weak and often cracked. Two-factor authentication, which uses your phone number to send a secondary code you have to enter, is much stronger.

I know first-hand how scary password hacks can be, but I still put off two-factor authentication for years — relying instead on a strong multi-digit 1Password-generated password — because it felt clunky and hard to set up. What if I lost access to my phone number because I was restoring my iPhone? What if I couldn't get network access for my two-factor code? Too much hassle, I thought.

Authy changed my opinion on two-factor authentication: The app makes it far less terrifying to deal with; it also lives on both my Mac and iOS devices, so I don't have to worry about losing access to my accounts while my phone is restoring.

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How to set up two-factor authentication for Dropbox

Dropbox has become a valued repository for many people, yours truly included — folks keep writing, PDFs, photos, and more in the cloud-based storage service. As such, you almost definitely don't want it compromised by enterprising hackers or devious thieves.

Two-factor authentication can provide a strong barrier against such attacks by requiring that anyone who attempts to access your account have both your password and access to your mobile devices. Here's how to set it up.

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How to set up two-factor authentication for Tumblr

You may not keep security information or top-secret plans on your Tumblr account, but that doesn't mean it's not worth securing from potential password hacks. Here's a quick guide on setting up two-factor authentication to protect your Tumblr gifsets, memes, songs, blogs, and more.

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How to set up two-factor authentication for Facebook

If you use Facebook, chances are there's a whole host of personal and semi-private information you don't want anyone else getting ahold of. Never fear: You can protect your Facebook account from potential hacks with little trouble thanks to the company's two-factor authentication integration. Here's how you can set it up.

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How to set up two-factor authentication for Twitter

Twitter can be a powerful mouthpiece for yourself, your brand, or your business — and an even more powerful weapon if your login credentials fall into the wrong hands. You can protect your account by enabling Twitter's two-factor authentication options; here's how.

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iPhone vs. Android and hardware encryption

iPhones have supported hardware encryption for over 5 years. Android phones... well, it's complicated.

When Google announced Android Lollipop, one of the most important features for customers in the post-Edward Snowden era was hardware encryption enabled by default. Put simply, on first-boot your personal data would be kept far safer on your personal device. Unfortunately, it looks like default hardware encryption in Lollipop is a nice-to-have, not a must-have, and many Android phone vendors have simply decided to keep it off.

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Authy snapped up by Twilio for two-factor authentication

Authy, a company that specializes in security through two-factor authentication, has been purchased by cloud communication services company Twilio. The two companies have been working together since 2012, with Authy using Twilio's technology to deliver authentication codes through SMS and phone calls. For the time being, Authy will continue to function as it always has, though certain parts of the company will expand with the acquisition, according to fonder Daniel Palacio:

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