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Essential Tools for Cleaning your MacBook Pro or MacBook Air 2022

MacBook Pro keyboard
MacBook Pro keyboard (Image credit: Rene Ritchie/iMore)

Whether you want to believe it or not, your MacBook Pro keyboard is likely going to get dirty. From the oils on your hands to the dust in the air, you'll need to spend some time every few weeks cleaning your MacBook. If you don't, you risk gunk and grime getting into sensitive parts of the hardware, which in turn, could cost you money to repair. The best MacBook is a clean MacBook. It doesn't matter how great our review of the MacBook Pro with M1 chip makes the computer out to be if you let it get dirty and stop functionally properly. If you want to avoid repairs and keep your MacBook, MacBook Air, or MacBook Pro looking clean and tidy, here are some essential tools for cleaning your MacBook.

Note: Before using any cleaning product on your MacBook, MacBook Air, or MacBook Pro, make sure you have powered down the laptop.

A few cleaning tips

Just using a laptop out of the box isn't going to be the best experience for most people. A lot of the best Macbook Pro and MacBook Air accessories that you can consider to ensure you get the most out of your device. Something you might overlook, however, is cleaning supplies. It's important to be cleaning your MacBook regularly to help prevent any annoying issues down the line and to ensure you aren't spreading germs and bacteria as much as you can.

Apple recommends the only type of cloth you use to clean your Mac laptops is lint-free, soft Microfiber cloths (opens in new tab). They really are the must-have cleaning tool in your arsenal. Make sure when you use them, you only get the cloth lightly damp and do your best to keep moisture away from any ports.

Of course, keeping your keyboard clean is of the utmost importance. The butterfly keyboards on Mac laptops have been known to have issues with crumbs getting underneath the switches. Compressed air (opens in new tab) is some of the best stuff to use to blow out unwanted dirt and dust from your keyboard keys. Apple has a handy guide to using compressed air (opens in new tab) on your Mac laptop. The real key is to make sure you don't use the compressed air too close to the device.

Luke Filipowicz
Luke Filipowicz

Luke Filipowicz has been a writer at iMore, covering Apple for nearly a decade now. He writes a lot about Apple Watch and iPad but covers the iPhone and Mac as well. He often describes himself as an "Apple user on a budget" and firmly believes that great technology can be affordable if you know where to look. Luke also heads up the iMore Show — a weekly podcast focusing on Apple news, rumors, and products but likes to have some fun along the way. 


Luke knows he spends more time on Twitter than he probably should, so feel free to follow him or give him a shout on social media @LukeFilipowicz.