In Short

Wearables are the next big frontier for smart technology. And on March 18, 2014, Google announced its part in it — Android Wear. As the name implies, Android Wear is an Android-based initiative, using Google's mobile operating system and a dedicated software development kit to kick-start the wearables space.

On August 31, 2015, it was announced that Android Wear would also work with iOS devices, but for now only with the LG Watch Urbane (though it appears that other watches unofficially work as well). Soon, iOS users should be able to choose from a plethora of Android Wear devices including those from Motorola, HTC, LG and others. iPhone users are able to view notifications and Google Now cards, as well as use fitness tracking and voice search.

You can think of Android Wear as an extension of the experience you may have grown to enjoy with Google Now. And just like with our smartphones, Android Wear will have us talking to our watches. You'll be able to speak to request information as well as reply to information you've already received. Weather info. Chats with friends and family. Direct queries. Direct actions.

Android Wear is starting with smartwatches. Motorola and LG were first out of the gate, announcing the Moto 360 and the LG G Watch. But Motorola for whatever reason didn't get its watch out the door until September. Meanwhile, Samsung swooped in at Google I/O with its fourth wearable in less than a year, the Gear Live. Google has said it's also working with other partners in the Android Wear space, including HTC and ASUS, as well as chip manufacturers Broadcom, Imagination, Intel, Mediatek and Qualcomm. So Android Wear isn't solely a Google endeavor. Even fashion brands like Fossil are in on Android Wear, and other fashion and luxury brands are bound to follow.