Safari

How to selectively remove stored passwords in Safari for Mac

Safari for Mac is arguably one of the best browsers, not to mention the native option. With options like iCloud tabs across OS X and iOS, it makes it an excellent choice across platforms. Safari, like most other browsers, gives you the option to save passwords so you don't have to enter them each and every time. If there are passwords you've either accidentally saved or no longer want Safari remembering, you can selectively delete them instead of clearing all passwords.

Here's how:

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Apple declines to fix vulnerability in Safari's Web Archive files, likely because it requires user action to exploit

Metasploit software developer Joe Vennix has detailed a vulnerability in Safari’s webarchive file format along with how it can be exploited. The post on Rapid7 indicates that after being reported to Apple back in February, the bug was closed last month with a status of “wontfix”, indicating that Apple has no plans to address the bug. So what is it and why is that?

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How to quickly access your browsing history in Safari for iPhone or iPad

It's arguable that mobile Safari on the iPhone and iPad is one of the best mobile browsers out there. Not only do you have a great browsing experience but the ability to sync iCloud tabs, search for text within web pages, and much more.

When it comes to browsing history, while you can always navigate to your browsing history the regular way, there's actually a much faster way to get there...

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Google forks WebKit, announces new Blink rendering engine

Google has announced that they're forking the Apple-led open source WebKit to create their own, new Blink HTML rendering engine. According to the Chromium blog:

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Debug 11: Don Melton and Safari

Don Melton, former Engineering Director of Internet Technologies at Apple, talks to Guy and Rene about assembler on the Apple II, open-sourcing Mozilla, building Nautilus, creating WebKit and the Safari browser, teaching bears to dance, and cleaning cusses from code bases.

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No Safaris left to conquer

Don Melton on why, when he looked upon the breadth of his WebKit and Safari work at Apple, he retired:

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The day Steve Jobs unveiled the Safari web browser

Don Melton, the man hired by Scott Forstall to build a web browser for the Mac, and later iOS, is continuing his post-Apple turn as a blogger, this time reminiscing about the day Steve Jobs introduced Safari at Macworld 2003. Writing on donmelton.com talks, in part, about the reaction to their use of Konquerer's KHTML instead of Firefox's Gecko rendering engine:

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How the Safari browser started life as Alexander and hid itself from the world

Don Melton, who was originally tasked by Scott Forstall to create WebKit and the Safari browser for OS X, and later WebKit of iOS, has retired from his job as engineering director of internet technologies, and begun writing. One of his writing projects is a blog, and two of his recent posts shed some light on the people and events behind Safari.

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iOS 6 preview: Safari tab sync, uploads, banners, and full screen mode

Safari has been on the iPhone since the first version launched in 2007, and has been steadily improved, year after year, version after version, ever since. iOS 6 follows the same, steady, evolutionary pattern, addressing long standing user pain-points like image uploads, and providing parity with features from other browsers, like Chrome's tab sync. It also makes Reading List more robust, and provides an interesting way for websites to alert users about, and move them into, apps.

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iOS claims 65% of mobile web, Android 20%

iOS users are the most active on the web, claiming 65.27% of the total market share compared to Android, in distant second with 19.73%, and Java ME further behind still with 10.22%. BlackBerry trailed with 1.87%, though even a year ago it was only around 3%. Google still rocks the mobile search engine chart, accounting for 91% of all searches from a tablet or smartphone. Out of all web traffic monitored, mobile account for 8.2% of activity, which is up from around 6% last year. All of this, according to metrics company NetMarketShare's most recent web analytics survey.

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