Speed

iPhone 3GS Doesn't Support HSUPA for High Speed 3G Upload

Macworld is reporting that while the iPhone 3GS chipset does indeed support the new (for North America!) HSPDA download speed of 7.2 Mbps, Apple didn't see fit to equip it with the matching HSUPA upload speed of 1.4/1.9 Mbps. Indeed, they claim the iPhone 3GS will top out its uploads (sending videos to YouTube, emailing photos, etc.) at a comparatively anemic 384 Kbps.

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The Need for iPhone 3G S Speed. Or, What Did You Want, a Built-In Espresso Maker?!

Jeremy and Chad both gave excellent, compelling reasons for why they ARE SO or ARE NOT upgrading to the iPhone 3G S. For certain, intelligent people will have different yet equally valid reasons for choosing to upgrade, or not to upgrade. For myself?

Apple had me at speed.

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iPhone 3G S - 2x Faster, but Still no 802.11n

Looks like DaringFireball.net nailed it: the S in iPhone 3G S stands for speed. Faster processors (we're guessing both CPU and GPU in line with new ARM and PowerVR chips), new OpenGL ES 2.0 implementation (no word on OpenCL yet, which leverages GPUs and CPUs).

HSPA cell downloads are also boosted up to 7.2 Mbps, where available.

Missing in the speed-boost department, however, was any word on support for 802.11n Wi-Fi according to the Tech Specs.

Guess we're waiting on fourth gen for that?

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From the Forums: iPhone Data Prices, Top 5 Apps, CrApp List, 3G Data Speed

Welcome to From the Forums, a regular post here at TiPb that gives you, our readers, the chance to get involved in our ever growing community. To get yourself started please register, it will only take a moment of your time, we promise. Now that's out of the way, lets dive right into some of the better threads for today.

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More Details on AT&T Upgrading Network in Advance of Next Gen iPhone

We'd mentioned previously that AT&T is upgrading the ole rabbit-eared 3G network for Apple's upcoming next generation iPhone, and WMExperts covered it yesterday, but it's worth surfacing the details:

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AT&T Supercharging Network in Advance of Next Gen iPhone?

Apple Insider reports that AT&T is trying to increase the coverage, reliability, and speed of it's 3G network in anticipation of Apple's next gen iPhone hardware coming this summer (perhaps to be introduced, like last year, at WWDC in June?).

AT&T's current 3G supports up to 3.6Mb/s, though AT&T has said they have the infrastructure to go to 7.2Mb/s, with 14.4 and 20Mb/s feasible within a couple of years. As for the iPhone specifically:

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The 2nd Gen iPod Touch is Faster than Your iPhone 3G

On other mobile platforms (hi Windows Mobile!) we often spend quite a bit of time comparing the processors of different models, seeing which one is faster and seeing what happens when you set the clock speed of a given phone to a higher number. It's "fun," see, because not only can clock speed be radically different from phone to phone, but so can performance even on devices with similar clock speeds.

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How To: Disable Javascript to Speed up MobileSafari on the iPhone

Dieter just told us about Crackberry Kevin's uber-frustrating experiences trying to pit the iPhone 3G and Blackberry Bold head to head in the browser war to end all browser wars. But -- silver lining -- for iPhone users, not only did we snag bragging rights, but a handy tip as well!

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iPhone 2.0: Mobile Safari Browser Speed Boost!

Between the time you click a link and a web page finishes loading on your iPhone, there are many factors that ultimately decide just how fast that process will be, including connection speed (2.5 G EDGE/3G HSDPA/WiFi) CPU speed, and rendering engine. Like desktop Safari, Mobile Safari uses Apple's open source WebKit rendering engine, and it seems like for 2.0, WebKit has gotten its turbo on, especially in handling Javascript. Says Daring Fireball:

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