Apple's bid to remove the antitrust monitor installed at the company has been rejected by a federal appeals court.

Apple's efforts to remove Michael Bromwich, the antitrust monitor appointed to the company by a U.S. federal judge, have been rejected by an appeals court. Bromwich was installed at the company following a court's finding that Apple had violated U.S. antitrust law in their ebook deals with publishers. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals held that an early rejection of the bid was not an abuse of judicial discretion, according to Reuters:

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York said a lower court judge did not abuse her discretion in rejecting Apple's bid to disqualify Michael Bromwich as monitor, even though some of the company's allegations against him "give pause."

Apple has been unhappy with Bromwich since almost the second he arrived. The company has attempted to remove him multiple times. They believe that Bromwich has abused his role, and as of this February, had billed the company for $2.65 million for his services. They also state that he regularly inspects parts of the company with no relevance to his purpose.

Source: Reuters