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Apple Watch saves life of Georgia man with blood clots

Time To Walk On Apple Watch Se
Time To Walk On Apple Watch Se (Image credit: Luke Filipowicz / iMore)

What you need to know

  • A Georgia man credits his Apple Watch for saving his life after its heart rate monitor encouraged him to get medical attention.

A man from Evans, Georgia, credits his Apple Watch with saving his life after his heart rate monitor encouraged him to seek medical attention.

As reported by WDRW:

It's a token example of technology becoming more and more impressive, but an Evans man's Apple watch was a lifesaver.Keith Simpson, 43, has a wife, two teens, and a love of photography."I took up photography when I wanted to get healthier because it forced me to get out of the house and walk around," Simpson said.But when he started feeling off one day in November.

Simpson says his wife could see how "flushed" he looked, and that he checked his Apple Watch to see what his heart rate was. Sure enough, it had dropped well below its usual rate, and after using a blood pressure monitor and the Watch from home, a doctor told Simpson to seek medical attention immediately.

Hospital staff found Simpson had seven blood clots that they were able to treat. Simpson apparently credits his Apple Watch for saving his life. In fact, to celebrate, his wife bought him a new one as an early Christmas gift a few weeks later. Simpson also emailed Tim Cook, stating "I've heard life changing stories of people using Apple products, I just never thought one of those stories would be me until it was".

Simpson even got a response from Cook, who said it was this kind of story that "inspires us to keep pushing forward."

Stephen Warwick
Stephen Warwick

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.

1 Comment
  • Another instance where the Apple Watch is given undeserved credit. Reading the brief information shared, it is clearly evident that Mr. Simpson was unwell & should have sought medical attention. A slow pulse rate can be easily identified by counting the radial (wrist) pule & does not need a device. The possible value of the heart rrhythm monitoring feature of the Apple Watch is the detection of aymptomatic (no symptoms) atrial fibrill.tion that might, if not detcted & appropriately managed, lead to catastrophic complications such as a stroke.