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Florida man's life saved by Apple Watch on Thanksgiving

Apple Watch Heart Beat
Apple Watch Heart Beat (Image credit: Rene Ritchie/iMore)

What you need to know

  • A Florida Man's life may have been saved by his Apple Watch.
  • Roy Robinson was travelling to visit family over the holidays when his Apple Watch detected atrial fibrillation.
  • Doctors and nurses were queuing up to see "the guy who was saved by the Apple Watch".

A Florida man's life may have been saved after his Apple Watch detected atrial fibrillation whilst he was travelling over the holidays.

Roy Robinson, 74, was visiting family in Baltimore for Thanksgiving. The Lake Worth, Florida, resident had taken a trip to see his granddaughter in school with his wife Dale. After climbing several flights of stairs Roy found himself very short of breath, as ABC News reports:

Robinson's wife, Dale Robinson, knew something was off when they visited their granddaughter at school. "She wanted to show us her classroom, so he went up to the third floor, and he was out of breath when he got there which is very unlike him.

His Apple watch sent him an alert to say it had detected a possible atrial fibrillation, but Robinson had no idea what this was. Naturally, Robinson said the first thing that they did was finish their Thanksgiving dinner. After, his son insisted that Robinson go to the hospital, where he told nurses that his Apple Watch had said he was in Afib. He was given an EKG and later admitted to the hospital.

According to reports, a queue of doctors, nurses, residents and interns came to see him saying "I want to see the guy who was saved by the Apple Watch. The icing? Apple CEO Tim Cook event sent him a personal email wishing him well.

Stephen Warwick
Stephen Warwick

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.

2 Comments
  • As a person with AFIB - who was diagnosed years ago - headlines like this are very misleading to your readers. AFib is NOT fatal in itself, BUT it can lead to potentially life-threatening complications down the line if not treated over time. Two of the most common complications of AFib are stroke and heart failure. So saying the Apple Watch saved this man's life is a bit of a stretch - and it really makes it sound as if the Afib would have killed him otherwise. Please be more responsible with your zeal over the watch and it's medical "miracles".
  • Whilst the title may be exaggerated, you still said it yourself: "it can lead to potentially life-threatening complications down the line if not treated over time". It may not have saved his life in the short term, but it certainly could've down the line, it's always better to treat these things as early as possible, and the Apple Watch helped with that. Plus it said he was out of breath, what happened if he collapsed? He could bang his head in such a way that would kill him, but the Apple Watch would also detect this as a fall and call emergency services. The Apple Watch won't save everyone, but it has helped a lot of people, and I love seeing articles like this, even if they do exaggerate the situation a bit