Editorial

Heartbleed, the new OpenSSL hack: How does it affect OS X and iOS?

OpenSSL is popular open source encryption software used all over the Internet. It's been in the news a lot lately, with a lot of dire warnings about what a newly discovered bug means for your personal data. Is it a threat to OS X security or iOS security? Do you need to be worried about your Mac, iPhone or iPad being vulnerable?

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There won't be another iPhone-class product, not for Apple, not for anyone, not for a long time

Apple needs another iPhone-class product or they're doomed. We heard it right after the iPhone was released. We heard it right after the iPad was released. We're hearing it now. From shoddy journalists to market mad-people it's the single most consistent, most bullshit Apple narrative of the last half-decade. What makes it so daft, so egregiously wrong-headed, is that there isn't a business as big as the iPhone, not for Apple, not for anyone, and there won't be again. Not for years more to come.

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For game maker Aspyr, Mac App Store presents unique challenges

When Steve Jobs introduced the Mac App Store in 2011, he said that Apple wasn't trying to compete with other app download services. While that may be true — Apple doesn't enforce any sort of exclusivity requirement — the Mac App Store has evolved to present some unique challenges to app publishers. Case in point: Long time Mac publisher Aspyr, which plans to mix things up a bit in 2014.

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The Mac App Store and the trouble with sandboxing

I've written before about some of the limitations that Apple imposes on game developers who want to sell their games through the Mac App Store. The problem isn't limited to games — Apple's rules for how Mac App Store apps work keep lots of different apps from being distributed.

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Write the code. Change the World Wide Developers Conference.

By the time I finish writing this the WWDC 2014 lotto will be all but over and developers, designers, and interested parties the world over will find out if they have the opportunity to pay somewhere between one and two thousand dollars for a ticket. That's a marked difference from last year when pre-announced tickets sold out in seconds and years previous when no one knew when tickets would go on sale. You'd think the idea of leaving a ticket up to chance would be stressful, but not having to set bots and alarms and hope for the best has been well received. It's been seen as more egalitarian and, importantly, more human. It's a huge difference in how Apple handles the engineering and space constraints of WWDC, and it's not the only difference this year.

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iWork regains its AppleScript mojo but there's still work for Apple to do

As Apple released OS X 10.9 Mavericks last fall they also introduced new versions of their iWork applications — Keynote, Pages and Numbers. The new release created major disruptions for long-time iWork users who depended on automation workflows that were no longer available in the new releases.

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Reminder: Financial analysts want to move Apple's stock price, not inform its customers

Financial analysts say the dumbest things, like if Apple doesn't release an iWatch in the next two months they're doomed, or that supply chain sources say unannounced products are delayed or have defects and it means doom, or that iPads aren't selling fast enough, or too fast, or— you get the idea. And they're almost always wrong. So why do they say these things and, more importantly, how can anyone whose job it is to cover Apple for investors be wrong so goram-always and still keep their jobs? Easy. Because informing people like us, customers who actually buy and enjoy Apple products isn't their job.

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What's a 'carrier update' for iPhone or iPad and why do we get them?

If you've had an iPhone or cellular capable iPad for an extended period of time, you've undoubtedly received a notification about a carrier update. Some are mandatory and don't give you an option to say no or remind me later. Others just hang out and bug you occasionally until you actually perform the update. One of the biggest questions we get asked here at iMore by you, our readers, is what exactly is a carrier update and what does it actually contain?

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Apple TV vs. Fire TV: Can Amazon's new contender knock the champ out of the ring?

The set top box market is heating up. In the U.S. it's been a two-horse race between the Apple TV and Roku's boxes. Things began to change after Google introduced its Chromecast device last year. Apple TV remains the champion, but now there's a new contender: Amazon's new Fire TV. Does this spell the end of Apple's dominance in the set top box arena?

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The mobile camera war is currently being fought in glass, in chips, in apps, and on the cloud. Where should iPhone 6 be?

With the iPhone 6, presumably due sometime this fall, Apple will no doubt continue its focus on photography and on making the best "everyday" cameras in the business. There are several ways to do that. You can have a big piece of glass that takes up a lot of space but captures an incredible amount of information. You can have an amazing image signal processor (ISP) that takes what information is captured and makes incredible use of it. You can have killer software that takes the bits, analyzes and processes the pixels out of them, and creates incredible results. And you can have fantastic cloud services that take whatever comes out of the phone and applies incredible server-side power to it. In other words, in the glass, in the chip, in the apps, in the cloud. Nokia and its 41-megapixel Carl Zeiss lenses, Apple and their A-series processors, Samsung and their bevy of features, and Google and their auto-awesome servers are examples of all three approaches. So where can Apple and the iPhone 6 go next?

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