Editorial

History of iPhone 4: Changing everything — again

Leading up to the iPhone 6 event we're updating and expanding our series on the history of the iPhone, continuing with the device that changed everything — again — the iPhone 4

Steve Jobs returned to the WWDC keynote stage on June 7, 2010. He'd introduced the iPad earlier in the year, and kicked things off with an update on how it, and the App Store had been doing (spoiler: Well!). Then he turned his attention to iPhone, and after recapping everything Apple had done to date, he began on what would come next. It had over 100 new features. It has an all-new design, an all-new camera, and an all new screen resolution. It was hot. It was the iPhone 4

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Health in iOS 8: Explained

Health is the name for a new, built-in Apple app coming with iOS 8. It serves as both a repository for all the health-related data accumulated by your iPhone, your apps, and your accessories, and a dashboard to help you make better, more visual sense of it — a front-end for your quantified life. To facilitate all this, Apple is providing the HealthKit framework to developers and manufacturers. But how does it all work?

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History of iPhone 3GS: Faster and more powerful

Leading up to the iPhone 6 event we're updating and expanding our series on the history of the iPhone, continuing with the more powerful iPhone 3GS

Steve Jobs didn't give the WWDC keynote on June 8, 2009. He was away on medical leave. So, a team of Apple executives soldiered on without him. That included Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing, Phil Schiller, who's task was to fill the biggest New Balances in the business for what was becoming Apple's biggest business. Schiller started off quoting Time Magazine's praise for the last generation, "the phone that has changed phones forever." He'd go on to make that phone more affordable forever, while also introducing its successor. It boasted twice the speed, both for processing and data networking. It was the iPhone 3GS.

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Spotlight in iOS 8: Explained

Spotlight is the name of Apple's system-wide search feature on both the Mac and iOS. With iOS 8, Spotlight is getting some new smarts, including location and context awareness, so it can help you find not only what you're looking for on your iPhone or iPad, but on the web as well. But how does the new Spotlight work?

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History of iPhone 3G: Twice as fast, half the price

Leading up to the iPhone 6 event we're updating and expanding our series on the history of the iPhone, continuing with the faster, less expensive iPhone 3G

At WWDC 2008 on June 9, after finalizing the details of the upcoming App Store, and summing up the original iPhone's achievements, the late Steve Jobs dove into the next challenges Apple had to face, the next mountain they had to climb. On the surface, they were obvious even before Jobs bulleted them on stage — 3G, Enterprise, third-party apps, more countries, and more affordable. The software changes came as part of iPhone OS 2.0. The hardware, iPhone 3G.

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NSFW: Can we try not to be dicks to each other for a while?

NSFW is a weekly op-ed column in which I talk about whatever's on my mind. Sometimes it'll have something to do with the technology we cover here on iMore; sometimes it'll be whatever pops into my head. Your questions, comments and observations are welcome.

Wil Wheaton — the actor who portrayed teen prodigy Wesley Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation — has had a second career as an Internet celebrity (he's also parlayed it into guest spots on TV shows like The Big Bang Theory and his own show on the SyFy Channel). There's an axiom named after him: "Wheaton's Law," which states, "Don't be a dick." It's short and to the point. And it's a really good guide for behavior both online and off, and I really wish more people would pay attention to it.

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History of iPhone: Apple reinvents the phone

Leading up to the iPhone 6 event we're updating and expanding our series on the history of the iPhone, starting with the original!

On January 9, 2007 the late Steve Jobs put sneaker to Macworld stage to give one of the most incredible keynote presentations of his life — a life filled with incredible keynotes — and in the history of consumer electronics. There, he said he would be introducing a wide-screen iPod with touch controls, a revolutionary mobile phone, and a breakthrough internet device. But it wasn't three products. It was one product. We got it. It was the iPhone.

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AAPL hits record high stock price — What's next for shareholders?

This week AAPL stock price crossed $100, which is equivalent to over $700 prior to the 7:1 stock split that happened earlier this year. This represents a record high. That makes Apple's market value $600 billion. (A company's market value is determined by multiplying the share price by the number of shares in existence.) I've been an Apple shareholder ever since the original iPhone launched. At the time I was working as a sell-side analyst in Toronto covering tech stocks such as Research In Motion (now renamed to BlackBerry). Even though I was totally wrong about how badly Apple (and Android) would destroy BlackBerry, I had a friend of mine, who was living in San Francisco, buy me an iPhone and Fedex it to me in Canada. Even being an EDGE device (i.e. prior to 3G) I was convinced Apple had a game changer on its hands. So I bought the stock for a split-adjusted $19. Yeah. It's been a nice ride.

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When the Apple logo really doesn't matter

Last week I posted an editorial extolling the virtues of Apple-branded routers: I think the AirPort Extreme, Time Capsule and AirPort Express make a lot of sense, even if their price and performance can be trumped by other products. There are loads of other cases where I wouldn't even hesitate to go with a third party instead. Here are some of them.

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Photos for OS X Yosemite: Explained

Photos for iOS 8 brings significant enhancements to the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad, including the new iCloud Photo Library, favorites, smart search, smart editing, custom photo and sharing extensions, and PhotoKit so developers can get in on al the action. Apple announced it at WWDC 2014, and then they did something unexpected — they announced Photos would also be coming to the Mac. Rebuilt from pixel to bit, Photos for Mac won't arrive with OS X Yosemite this fall, but will arrive sometime early next year. So what does all of this mean for existing iPhoto and Aperture customers, and, going forward, photography on the Mac?

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