Editorial

Could Apple offer iTunes affiliate revenue to carriers as a subsidy for LTE data plans?

Last week we saw Amazon drop a bit of a bomb on the competition by offering a $50 per year data plan. At 250MB a month, it isn’t a very good data plan, but people will buy it. I wondered how Amazon could have negotiated such a good deal with AT&T. Perhaps they’re cutting them in on revenue from users who shop on Amazon while using a Kindle Fire HD via the LTE data network? It was purely speculation, but it intrigued me enough that I spent a bit more time thinking about this whole topic. And I quickly realized that Apple actually has a pretty well-established iTunes affiliate program.

More →

2
loading...
0
loading...
72
loading...
0
loading...

Editor's desk: Jeff Bezos vs. Steve Jobs, ultimate copy loop, and 4 years, 7000 posts, and 2 million words later...

Less. Than. Three. That's how many days remain until Apple holds their September 12 event and we almost certainly get our first, official look at the iPhone 5. I just put up a fancy new iPhone super page to keep track of all the action, and we have lots more coming this week.

Starting tonight as I talk geek-to-geek with Fox New's Clayton Morris about what we can expect at the big event. You don't want to miss that. But before we get too caught up on the week ahead, here are some final thoughts on the week that was, including Amazon vs. Apple, the ultimate copy loop, and a sentimental moment for yours truly...

More →

3
loading...
0
loading...
85
loading...
0
loading...

Nokia gets caught faking Lumia 920 image stabilization

Normally I wouldn't be writing about something like Nokia getting caught faking the camera work in their Lumia 920 PureView, but Nokia has been making some pretty bad marketing choices lately. They made those "smartphone beta test" commercials where they tried to brand the iPhone as a beta phone, and then launched the Lumia 900 with embarrassing bugs all it's own. Then, yesterday, Nokia took a swipe at Apple during their press event, once again making fun of the iPhone antenna. And now Nokia is embroiled in controversy over their new flagship phone.

More →

2
loading...
0
loading...
79
loading...
0
loading...

Regarding iPad 2,5 and iPad 2,6

Apple has model numbers for all their products. The original iPhone was iPhone 1,1. The iPhone 3G was iPhone 1,2. The current iPhone 4S is iPhone 4,1. The next iPhone will be iPhone 5,1. Likewise, the original iPad was iPad 1,1. The iPad 2 was iPad 2,1. And the new iPad is iPad 3,1. The Retina MacBook Pro is MacBookPro 10,1. Following pre-production code names, that's how Apple classifies things internally.

Within models, there are variants. The iPhone 3G was a radio variant of the original iPhone 1,1 but was fairly similar otherwise, hence iPhone 1,2. The iPhone 3GS got a whole new chipset, so also got a model bump to 2,1. Likewise, the iPad 2 was a leap ahead of the original, so it got iPad 2,1. At least the Wi-Fi version did. The GSM/AT&T version got iPad 2,2 and the CDMA/Verizon version got iPad 2,3. When Apple updated the internals again this spring for the newer, lower cost version, that variant was iPad 2,4.

iPad 2,5 has been showing up in developer logs for months and iPad 2,6 was noted yesterday by Marco Arment on Marco.org. So what are they?

More →

0
loading...
2
loading...
68
loading...
0
loading...

Editor's desk: Forumed, friendless, and fined

This week was a blur punctuated by something neither tragic nor triumphant. Part gut check, part gut punch. So let's spin up the FTL drives and jump right to it...

More →

0
loading...
0
loading...
55
loading...
0
loading...

Tim Cook: Year One

Tim Cook became CEO of Apple one year ago yesterday, following the retirement of Steve Jobs. A soft-spoken, measured, methodical gentleman from the South, he'd been Apple's COO for years, and ran the company on several occasions during Steve Jobs' medical leaves of absence. A logistical and supply-chain genius, he took Apple from being better if more expensive, to much better at prices the competition couldn't begin to match. He helped take Apple from a computer company with a small if premium market share to a consumer electronic juggernaut that could launch products across the world at an unbelievable pace.

More →

4
loading...
15
loading...
107
loading...
0
loading...

Why an LTE iPhone 5 won’t be a very attractive proposition for UK consumers

There has been a lot of talk over how the iPhone 5 will be a major upgrade from the current iPhone 4S. Consistent rumors point to not only a taller screen but most importantly an LTE radio. What is LTE and why does it matter? LTE in very basic terms is a mobile data technology that offers very fast data. Imagine if you will, downloading data onto your iPhone at a something like 50Mbit/s in real world situations and you’re getting the gist

More →

2
loading...
0
loading...
87
loading...
0
loading...

Regarding separate iPhone 5 and iPad mini events

John Gruber of Daring Fireball wrote yesterday that he thinks it's unlikely Apple will introduce both the iPhone 5 and iPad mini at the same event, rumored to be taking place on September 12.

More →

0
loading...
0
loading...
63
loading...
0
loading...

Why an LTE iPhone will mean the most to Verizon

If Apple ships the next iPhone with support for fast LTE 4G networks, as rumors have suggested for a while, Verizon will be one of the networks that benefits the most. The current iPhone 4S is a mixed bag for Verizon, the slowest iPhone on the fastest network, but the next one won't be, and that will make a huge difference.

More →

4
loading...
0
loading...
57
loading...
0
loading...

Editor's desk: Training dragons

Been a busy week, so I'm going to rock the bullet points, Phil Nickinson style.

  • The picture up top is from last night. I went to see the live version of Dreamworks' How to Train your Dragon, and to say it was spectacular would be to do it a disservice. They combine 20 projectors (at $100k a pop), an incredible wire rig, and several full sized, brilliantly realized animatronic dragons into something you truly have to experience to believe. Watching Toothless take off did indeed make me believe a dragon could fly. If it comes to a city near you, check it out. And if you're up for it, stick around and meet the dragons afterwards. They're state-of-the-art-of-FX, and will not fail to impress.
  • Apple vs. Samsung is winding down in the U.S., but Motorola vs. Apple is picking up. While some may wish everyone involved would just cut it all out, they're big businesses and big money is involved, and until there's patent reform and much better precedent, it isn't going anywhere, any time soon. That being said, there's no way in hell I'm going to be writing about them everyday. We'll carefully pull the great stuff, like the iPhone and iPad prototypes, and highlight anything of significance, or that might have industry-wide ramifications, but otherwise we'll cherry pick the start and end points carefully.
  • As promised, we're continuing to roll out iMore 2.0 features. Here's the latest -- you can now subscribe to comments and get email alerts only when someone responds to you, or when any new comment is made on a post you've subscribed too. Consider it a beta for now, but try it out and let me know what you think of it.
  • So Twitter tightened the ropes on 3rd party client developers one step further this week. I've already given you my opinion, and linked to what other journalists and developers are saying. But to drive it home a little more sharply, I plan to crank up my app.net and Google+ activity from now on. Good services turn bad only when users sit by and do nothing. So I'll be doing something over at app.net as @reneritchie and Google+ as +Rene Ritchie for change, how about that?
  • The iPad mini looks like it's the real deal, but while we've learned it's going to be announced on September 12 alongside the iPhone 5, we haven't heard when it's going to ship yet, other than "October" (and that was a long time ago -- schedules can and do change). We also learned it was going to be $200 to $250, but that was back before the Amazon Kindle Fire and Google Nexus 7 failed to achieve any significant traction in the market. So here's the next big question -- when exactly will the iPad mini hit store shelves and what exactly will be the price?

More →

4
loading...
0
loading...
60
loading...
0
loading...

Pages