Editorial

iOS 7 and the continuing gamification of interface

iOS 7 is not only the most skeuomorphic and liberating version of Apple's mobile operating system to date, it's also potentially the most fun. (I say potentially because it's not finished yet, and we'll likely only know whether Apple truly achieves their vision once it launches this fall.) This idea -- the gamificaton of interface -- isn't new, of course. With iOS 7, Apple's simply, audaciously attempting to take it to the next level. Here's how...

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iOS 7 and the rejection of the unfamiliar

Thoughtful post from Chris Clark on the changes Apple made in iOS 7, the realities of the design languages old and new, and what it means for developers and designers. From his Release Candidate One blog:

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The new Mac Pro: purpose-built for performance

The most frequently repeated joke at WWDC about the new Mac Pro is that it looks like a trashcan or a cigarette tray. There's nothing trashy about it: it looks more like a jet turbine - an example of form following function so evident throughout Jony Ive's design catalog.

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Tripping with Andrew Stone at AltWWDC

Andrew Stone has seen a lot of changes in the Apple ecosystem - changes he talked about as a featured speaker at AltWWDC, the event that's happening concurrently with WWDC and is only a few blocks away.

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iOS 7 preview: New security features

Apple's iOS 7, announced earlier this week, brings a lot of changes to all areas of the operating system, and security is no exception. iOS 7, at least as much of it as has been publicly disclosed by Apple to date, includes a number of security-related enhancements, seeking not just to make your data more secure, but also make security more convenient.

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Hey you, the one running iOS 7 beta when you really shouldn't be: Stay classy!

I meant to publish this on Monday but I messed up and forgot to. Sorry about that. But it's the same every year. The iOS 7 beta is intended for developers to test for bugs and software compatibility. It's not intended to be an early release preview, or the daily driver for anyone's main phone. This year more than ever, iOS 7 is really beta. It's not done. It's not cooked. It's cool as hell but there's a reason there's a lineup at the Apple Store outside Moscone for iPod touches. Not even developers want to risk their main phone. (I don't have it on my main phone either.) So here's the deal...

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iOS 7 is the most skeuomorphic, most liberating version ever

iOS 7 is turbulence. It's change. That scares some people, and makes others hungry. It divides sentiment and reaction, and creates as much fear and noise as it does thoughtful analysis and future thinking. That iOS 7 in its current form had to be realized in under 8 months, that it involved designers at Apple outside the usual interactive team, and that the beta came in so hot the iPad version wasn't even ready, adds to the turbulence, and to the uneasy feeling that we're still in the midst of change rather than comfortably through it.

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Why we can't have nice apps and how Apple could fix it

Yahoo! just bought my favorite camera app for iOS, Kitcam, and removed it from the App Store. It's not the first time a great third party app has been been bought. Google has bought many apps, from the Slide apps to Nik Software apps (including Snapseed) to Sparrow. Facebook has bought Instagram, the Sofa apps, and Push Pop Press. Hell, Apple bought Siri and many others themselves. Not every third-party app that gets bought gets removed from the store, even if it's bought by Apple's biggest software competitor, Google, or an up-and-coming ones, like Facebook. (Yahoo! hasn't announced a mobile OS competitor, and may not be in the organizational shape to do so any time soon, but would be crazy not to have a project ongoing.)

This is why we can't have nice apps. And this is what Apple could do about it...

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Will FaceTime audio bring VoIP calling into regular, everyday smartphone use?

FaceTime audio has been jokingly referred to since its WWDC 2013 introduction by some, as the phone. While this may be amusing to some, the wider picture is something potentially more important. In adding audio only calling to FaceTime, Apple has created their own Skype. And, with it, opened up VoIP to the masses.

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How OS X Mavericks will save you power and boost performance

OS X Mavericks is the first OS X build to be named for something other than a big cat (Apple has run out of feline names, so they're switching to place names). it takes its name from a popular big wave surfing spot in northern California, not too far away from Apple's headquarters in Cupertino. And indeed, Mac users will be catching some big waves when Mavericks makes its way into the Mac App Store this fall.

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