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iOS 4 features: SMS/MMS failure exclamation badge

iOS 4 will now put an exclamation badge on the Messages app as a way to inform you when an SMS text or MMS multimedia message fails to send.

Previously, the exclamation badge was only present inside the Messages app itself, beside the message that failed to send. Unless you were there and checking, you might not see it, especially not right away.

Now, if and when there's been a failure to send, as long as you pass by the Messages icon on your home screen, there's a good chance you'll see it.

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UPDATED: iTunes accounts being hacked, used to cheat App Store?

It looks like there's been a sharp rise in iTunes accounts being hacked. We don't have any solid information on this yet, but when it comes to security TiPb believes in warning first, worrying about the details later. Engadget points to a link between the hacks and the rise in popularity of some Vietnamese book apps. Sounds crazy, but it's absolutely not funny:

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iPad live tonight! 6pm PT/9pm ET/2am BST

It's the 4th of July, and while Chad and Leanna may or may not declare their independence from the live show tonight, stalwart Canucks Rene and Georgia will be there for sure...

...Along with Bla1ze from CrackBerry.com to talk iPad and BlackBerry.

  • 6pm PT/9pm ET/2am BST

We'll take over the front page 15 minutes before the show, so chat with you soon!

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Frash: Android Flash ported to iPad

Frash is an effort to take Android's Flash implementation and get it working on an iPad, Jailbreak style. Brought to you by comex, the mind behind the Spirit Jailbreak, it follows up on his efforts to get Flash up on iPhone and iPod touch. How's it look? Check the video after the break.

Frash is a port of the Adobe Flash runtime for Android to the iPhone, using a compatibility layer, by comex ( http://twitter.com/comex ). Frash can currently run most Flash programs natively in the MobileSafari browser. Frash currently only runs on the iPad, but support for other devices (3GS+ only due to technical restrictions) is planned, as well as support for iOS 4.

A release is planned for when Frash is stable. Developers are welcome to join the effort at http://github.com/comex/frash – fork it and send a pull request with your patches.

Shot on an iPhone 4 and edited using iMovie on the phone.

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iPhone 4 - Faster 3G speeds or nothing but speed bumps?

While iPhone 4 adds 3G HSUPA (high speed uploads) to preview HSDPA 7.2 (high speed downloads) and is giving many users much faster data, others are filling our inboxes with complaints their speeds are so slow they border on 2G EDGE... or worse.

I know when I upgraded my iPhone 3GS to iOS 4 I had some data issues but almost immediately my carrier, Rogers, pushed out an OTA (over the air) Carrier Settings Update, taking it from 7.0 to 7.1. After that, I was flying.

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Consumer Reports: iPhone reception problems not unique, may not be serious

Consumer reports has posted up their thoughts on iPhone 4 and all the reception issues some users are experiencing. They start off by corroborating Apple's line that all phones, from smart to flip, suffer the same attenuation problems -- since they're all used by humans whose bodies are interfering bags of water.

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iPhone 3GS Recognizing FaceTime URLs?

It seems one sharp reader over at AppleInsider has noticed that the iPhone 3GS does indeed recognize FaceTime URLs under iOS 4. 

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Google CEO: We don't have a plan to beat Apple

Google CEO Eric Schmidt said in a recent interview that they're not in competition with Apple, even while taking a little shot at the company on whose board of directors he sat during the iPhone's development.

We don't have a plan to beat Apple, that's not how we operate," Schmidt says. "We're trying to do something different than Apple and the good news is that Apple is making that very easy."

"The difference between the Apple model and the Google model is easy to understand - they're completely different. The Google model is completely open. You can basically take the software - it's free - you can modify whatever you want, you can add any kind of app, you can build any kind of business model on top of it and you can add any kind of hardware. The Apple model is the inverse."

Which is poppycock, really.

I'm as invested in Google's services as I am Apple's products, but come on. Completely open? Like any company, Google is open in what doesn't make them money and proprietary as heck in what does. Android is open (under the Apache license, not GPL -- which should give the philosophical FOSSies pause) but Google certainly hasn't opened their search or AdWords platforms. Likewise Apple open sources WebKit (which Google uses for their browser) and OpenCL and Grand Central and FaceTime, but keeps their crown jewels equally closed. So enough already with the open stuff. You give me free services so you can mine my data, I sell my soul to you to use them. Deal. Just don't insult my intelligence while doing it.

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Apple unveiling iTunes cloud services and wireless syncing soon?

BGR is reporting that one of their reliable sources is claiming to know Apple's iTunes is going to the cloud and soon. The source states these cloud capabilities will be broken down into 3 separate groups:

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Apple posts open letter regarding iPhone 4 antenna reception issues

Apple has posted an open letter addressing the widely reported issues surrounding iPhone 4 antenna reception -- how it drops or loses signal when held in such a way that the lower left side is covered.

Short version is, Apple's claiming they are, and historically have been, miscalculating how they display signal strength as bars on iPhone. They repeat that all phones will drop some signal when held in certain place, Nokia, Android, BlackBerry, and iPhone alike, but because of the way Apple was displaying signal strength, the drop appeared far more dramatic on iPhone 4.

For example, if the signal drops two bars when you hold it, and you only really have two bars, you'd see no signal and understand the drop. If you have two bars but Apple is showing you 5 bars, and weighting the calculation far too heavily towards high bars, you could drop 2 bars and really have 0, but iPhone is still showing you 3, 4, or even 5 bars. There in lies epic frustrati

A software update, to be issues within a few weeks, will change the calculation to AT&T's recommended method, and Apple will make the lower signal bars easier to see at the same time. So, in other words, your signal will still drop but it won't look to be as good before it does so.

Apple also reiterates that both they and their customers continue to report that iPhone 4 has better than any previous model, and remind everyone that anyone unsatisfied can return an undamaged iPhone 4 for a refund within 30 days.

While this does seem to address the miss-reporting of signal strength Anandtech found in their tests, and acknowledging that iPhone 4 does get better reception and does drop fewer calls -- when it works -- it doesn't seem to address the higher levels of attenuation seen in raw signals, or some reports that the baseband software wasn't properly adjusting when that attenuation occurred.

A few weeks seems like a long time to push out an iOS 4.0.1 update just to fix signal bar strength reporting, so either Apple is just waiting until their usual late July window for their first update or are working on other bug fixes -- related to the antenna or other issues like the proximity sensor -- we'll have to wait and see.

Full letter after the break.

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