If Microsoft's 'ten' is causing you nothing but frustration, give Apple's 'ten' a try!

Microsoft seems to be trying everything short of sending former CEO Steve Ballmer to your house to forcibly upgrade you to Windows 10. (That's a joke. Ballmer is busy with Basketball.) It's so bad, it's making even long-time Microsoft journalists cranky. Er.

Paul Thurrott

Last week, Microsoft silently changed Get Windows 10 yet again. And this time, it has gone beyond the social engineering scheme that has been fooling people into inadvertently upgrading to Windows 10 for months. This time, it actually changed the behavior of the window that appears so that if you click the "Close" window box, you are actually agreeing to the upgrade. Without you knowing what just happened.

Previously, closing this window would correctly signal that you do not want the upgrade. So Microsoft didn't change the wording in the window. It didn't make an "Upgrade now" button bigger, or a non-existent "don't ever upgrade" button smaller. It pulled a switcheroonie.

Our sibling site, Windows Central, can tell you lots of reasons to stay with Windows 10. If you don't want to, though, and if the heavy-handedness is really rubbing you the wrong way, consider upgrading to OS X instead.

Apple doesn't currently force any upgrades on anyone, plus they make security and privacy a top-down, front-facing feature. Best of all, you can run Windows 7 in a virtual machine, access UNIX through the Terminal, and otherwise have every major platform all on the same machine, all right at your fingertips.

Give it a try. It'll restore your delight in computing.