Trying on the Edition is like trying on any other Apple Watch — just with $17,000 more rose gold.

Though we at iMore haven't yet been feeling fancy enough to go try on an Apple Watch Edition, Leah Yamhshon and Caitlin McGarry at Macworld each visited an Apple flagship store for an appointment, then chatted about their experiences.

It's a great read if you're curious about Apple's Edition try-on process — no, you don't need to prove your wealth to get a peek at rose gold, nor is there any pressure to buy the thing — and highlights what, to me, is most important about the try-on experiences:

Leah: My Edition appointment was the exact opposite: It was just me and a different associate, and he was really enthusiastic about the Watch. He asked me right off the bat if I had a chance to look at any of the styles and sizes or if I wanted him to go through the best combinations (to which I quickly replied: "38mm, rose gold, rose gray Modern Buckle, let's do this.").

While we waited, he guided me through the display watch (which is just like the ones found at the Watch/Watch Sport demo stations—a mounted Watch connected to an iPad that displays more info as you navigate through the Watch's functions) and answered every question I threw at him: He told me all about the gold-making process, the weight differences between the Watch, Sport, and Editon, what each of the buttons do, more about its Taptic Engine, and what some of his favorite Watch features were. He knew what was up, and really tailored the appointment to my interests. He also asked me what features I was most excited about and what I wanted to use the Watch for, so he could specifically guide me through those features. It was awesome.

Caitlin: That sounds exactly like my Watch Sport/steel Watch demo! Apple should standardize appointment procedures so everyone gets exactly the kind of customer service you detailed, no matter which Apple Watch they plan to buy. The only reason Editions necessitate separate appointments is because of the high level of security those gorgeous gold things require.

I have no plans to put down twenty grand on a first-generation Apple Watch, but after hearing Leah and Caitlin's experiences, I may go try on a rose gold Edition at some point, just to do it outside an Apple event. They're flamboyant and exclusive and not at all practical, but hey — at least Apple seemingly understands this and builds their appointments accordingly.

Source: Macworld