App StoreSource: Joe Keller / iMore

What you need to know

  • Apple has published the updates to its App Store Review Guidelines.
  • The new updates aim to curb fraud and scam apps from operating on the App Store.

Apple's latest App Store Review Guidelines aim to curb fraud, scams, and other misconduct by developers.

As reported by TechCrunch, the company has added a number of sections to the App Store Review Guidelines that including a key change to the Developer Code of Conduct that will remove a developer from the Apple Developer Program for repeated offenses.

One of the key updates on this front involves a change to Apple's Developer Code of Conduct (Section 5.6 and 5.6.1-5.6.4 of the Review Guidelines).

This section has been significantly expanded to include guidance stating that repeated manipulative or misleading behavior or other fraudulent conduct will lead to the developer's removal from the Apple Developer Program. This is something Apple has done for repeated violations, it claims, but wanted to now ensure was clearly spelled out in the guidelines.

In an entirely new third paragraph in this section, Apple says that if a developer engages in activities or actions that are not in accordance with the developer code of conduct, they will have their Apple Developer account terminated.

It also details what, specifically, must be done to restore the account, which includes providing Apple with a written statement detailing the improvements they've made, which will have to be approved by Apple. If Apple is able to confirm the changes has been made, it may then restore the developer's account.

Apple explained in a press briefing that this change was meant to prevent a sort of catch and release scenario where a developer gets caught by Apple, but then later reverts their changes to continue their bad behavior.

Apple has also added a new section about developer identity to ensure that the details of the developer are continuously updated and accurate.

As part of this update, Apple added a new section about developer identity (5.6.2). This is meant to ensure the contact information for developers provided to Apple and customers is accurate and functional, and that the developer isn't impersonating other, legitimate developers on the App Store. This was a particular issue in a high-profile incident of App Store fraud which involved a crypto wallet app that scammed a user out of his life savings (~$600,000) in Bitcoin. The scam victim had been deceived because the app was using the same name and icon as a different company that made a hardware crypto device, and because the scan app was rated 5 stars. (Illegitimately, that is).

Apple is also adding language that aims to crack down on the world of fake reviews so that apps that are suggested to you in the App Store are there because they are truly beloved.

Related to this, Apple clarified the language around App Store discovery fraud (5.6.3) to more specifically call out any type of manipulations of App Store charts, search, reviews and referrals. The former would mean to crack down on the clearly booming industry of fake App Store ratings and reviews, which can send scam app up higher in charts and search.

Meanwhile, the referral crackdown would address consumers being shown incorrect pricing outside the App Store in an effort to boost installs.

Another section (5.6.4) addresses issues that come up after an app is published, including negative customer reports and concerns and excessive refund rates, for example. If Apple notices this behavior, it will investigate the app for violations, it says.

In addition to trying to curb scams and fraud itself, Apple is now also turning to developers to help report these violations.

But a new update to these Guidelines seems to be an admission that Apple may need a little help on this front. It says developers can now directly report possible violations they find in other developers' apps. Through a new form that standardizes this sort of complaint, developers can point to guideline violations and any other trust and safety issues they discover. Often, developers notice the scammers whose apps are impacting their own business and revenue, so they'll likely turn to this form now as a first step in getting the scammer dealt with.

Another change will allow developers to appeal a rejection if they think there was unfair treatment of any kind, including political bias. Previously, Apple had allowed developers to appeal App Store decisions and suggest changes to guidelines.

Developers can read all of the new Apple Store Review Guidelines on the Apple Developer website.

We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more.