Whether you're planning to indulge in liquid libations this weekend, you just don't feel like walking through our lovely Smarch weather, or the public transit in your city isn't as good as it could be, you can pull up a ride-sharing and taxi app and be on your way in no time.

Here are some of the best apps for getting around your town.

Note: Not every app is available in every city, so we've recommended a variety of different apps to (hopefully) cover all your transportation bases.

Should you ride share or take a cab?



Unsure whether you should use a ride-sharing app or a taxi service? Our own Lory Gil broke down the difference when she reviewed Curb in 2017:

Taxis have a few advantages that ride-share companies do not. Taxi drivers are fully covered under their company's insurance policy. Ride-share drivers need personal insurance, and are partially covered while they have a rider in their car (and their app is open and running), but can be dropped from their insurance company if their coverage does not include commercial coverage.

Taxi drivers are also required to undergo a background check: In some states, a fingerprint scan is required, which is run through an FBI database. Many ride-share companies also perform background checks, but don't require a fingerprint scan.

The quick and dirty: Ride-sharing costs less and is easier to use. Taxis cost more, but provide better protection for the rider.

Lyft

Of the major ride-sharing services, Lyft tends to get the better rap — it was the first app to support tipping, and the company seems to continually experiment with new safety features and options for both its riders and customers.

Lyft offers a traditional single-car and large-car service in all its markets, but it also provides Lyft Line (or, as I like to call it, "the semi-private bus"). If you choose Lyft Line, you'll pay less to ride with 3-5 strangers who are taking similar routes. Your ride may last a bit longer, but if you're looking to save a few dollars (and meet interesting people!) it might be the way to go.

If you're in a major city in the US that supports Lyft, it's definitely worth trying out.

Uber

Let's get this out of the way: Uber's business practices don't particularly thrill anyone at iMore, myself included, and I try to avoid taking the service whenever possible. But if you're in an area where taking other transportation isn't an option, Uber is likely there: The service is available in 632 cities and counting worldwide.

Like Lyft, you can choose from several car options, including UberX andUberXL; major cities also have other cars available, including the upgraded Select and Black services, handicap-accessible Assist and WAV, and the Lyft Line-esque Pool and Shared Pool options. In some cities, you can even hire taxis from inside the Uber app (though Uber takes a cut of your fare).

If it's not a ride you seek, Uber also (weirdly) offers a delivery service called UberEats: You can summon a car to do a pickup order from your favorite restaurant and have it dropped off at your door.

Blacklane

If you need to rent a car for a lengthier period of time or want a fancy transportation experience, consider Blacklane: The high-end chauffeur service offers pre-booked black cars, SUVs, and limos in over 250 cities around the world; you can pick up a car for an airport ride, multi-hour adventure, or event. It'll cost you more than your average ride share or taxi cab, but most of that is the driver's time and your own experience.

Curb

Curb is the only proper taxi app on this list: It works in over 60 cities across the United States, tying the app to taxi drivers in your neighborhood.

You can use Curb like you would Lyft, pre-paying for your ride and tracking your progress, though you can also elect to pay for your ride in cash if you prefer. For a more traditional taxi experience, check out Curb. (And check out Lory's review of Curb, too!)

Your picks?

If you frequently take taxis or rent cars, what iPhone apps have you found to be the most useful? Let us know below!