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When it comes to working from home, iPhone bests Android-based devices

Handoff
Handoff (Image credit: iMore)

Working from home has become the norm for millions of hard-working employees around the world. For those new to the work from home concept, you might be wondering which is the best mobile solution, iOS, or Android. Over at our sister site Android Central, Joe Maring has come to a conclusion long embraced by Apple users. It's iOS and iPadOS over Android, of course.

There are lots of reasons Apple's mobile devices best their Android counterparts in this regard. Though often criticized by non-Apple users, it's the company's "walled-garden of an ecosystem" approach that positively differentiates the two, according to Maring.

His favorite Apple tools are the Universal Clipboard and Handoff. The former makes it possible to copy something on your mobile device and paste it on your Mac, and vice versa, while the latter lets you start a task on one machine and finish it on another.

Maring also focuses on select third-party apps that are available on both iOS and Android. The apps mentioned, Airtable and Concur, "are more nicely laid out on my iPhone than they are on the Pixel 4."

He continues, "You'll find this to be the case for a good handful of applications, and as someone that uses their phone as a tool for getting stuff done, having access to the best and most polished apps possible is a big deal."

Looking forward, Maring believes Google's decision to more closely align Android and Chrome will make a positive difference and improve integration between the two operating systems, at least in the long-term. Until then, he's sticking with his iPhone (over his Pixel 4 XL) for work use.

Lots to see

As someone who has owned nearly every iPhone ever released and is also a long-time Mac user, I naturally have a built-in bias for all things Apple. However, I can appreciate Maring's comments also as someone who also owns a Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus, and have had other Android-based devices in the past.

Since the beginning, Apple has always produced hardware and software. Only recently has Google slowly done the same. However, its hardware footprint is limited to a few Android-based Pixel handsets and its successful Chromebook lineup. At the same time, the top-selling Android device manufacturer remains Samsung, not Google.

For anyone working from home who needs more integration than an Android-based mobile device can provide, the water at Apple is nice and warm. Don't just take my word for it, one of my favorite Android experts says so too!

Bryan M Wolfe
Staff Writer

Bryan M. Wolfe has written about technology for over a decade on various websites, including TechRadar, AppAdvice, and many more. Before this, he worked in the technology field across different industries, including healthcare and education. He’s currently iMore’s lead on all things Mac and macOS, although he also loves covering iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. Bryan enjoys watching his favorite sports teams, traveling, and driving around his teenage daughter to her latest stage show, audition, or school event in his spare time. He also keeps busy walking his black and white cocker spaniel, Izzy, and trying new coffees and liquid grapes.

1 Comment
  • Remember to bring some popcorn when you go and read the Android Central article's comment section. Admittedly, Joe is using a MacBook which means he has access to the nice Handoff/Universal Clipboard features which are great, but he wouldn't be able to use them on Windows. And you could find a universal clipboard app for Windows, plus Handoff can "sort of" be simulated through syncing services through the Desktop/Mobile version of the app. But I do agree that iOS still has a better overall app ecosystem, some apps aren't as polished or don't behave as well on Android. In my experience, I still find iOS to be more stable which is also down to the apps you use, but it's a case of "YMMV", however stability is very important when doing work. I've been one of the many who has started working from home, although at my last job I did work from home anyway. I don't really use my phone much as the Mac is the main device where the work is done and we communicate through Microsoft Teams. It would be interesting to see an article for whether Windows or macOS is considered best for working from home, but either way people will use what works best for them