CapacitorsSource: Nikkei

What you need to know

  • A report from Japan claims an Apple supplier has developed 'ultrasmall' capacitors, one-fifth of the size of existing ones.
  • It is suggested that this will help free up space inside the next 5G iPhone.
  • The ceramic-based capacitors measure just 0.25mm by 0.125mm.

A report from Japan suggests that Apple supplier Murata has developed 'ultrasmall' capacitors that will help free up space for 5G in the next iPhone.

According to Nikkei Asian Review via MacRumors, the supplier has developed ceramic-based capacitors that measure just 0.25mm by 0.125mm. According to the report:

Apple and Huawei supplier Murata Manufacturing has developed an ultrasmall version of a mainstay electronic component, Nikkei has learned, an achievement that promises to free up space inside densely packed 5G smartphones.

As soon as the spring, the Japanese company is set to start mass-producing smaller multilayer ceramic capacitors that take up just one-fifth the space of existing ones, but have 10 times the electrical storage capacity.

Kyoto-area-based Murata ranks as the world's top producer of these capacitors, with a market share of about 40%.

Smartphones for fifth-generation wireless networks require bigger batteries and more parts to handle greater functions and a broader range of frequencies. As a result, space inside the devices is becoming cramped.

By creating capacitors that are just one-fifth of the size of existing components, it is hoped that this will give Apple more space to incorporate 5G into its next iPhone, rumored to be coming next year. 5G, of course, will draw more power from the iPhone's battery, so any space saved could help Apple to increase the size of the battery in the next-gen model. Not only that, but 5G also requires three flexible printed circuits within a unit, where 4G only needs one. Again, space-saving capacitors could be helpful there.

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The report follows remarks from Qualcomm's President Cristiano Amon, who says that the 5G iPhone is working on the device "as fast as we can," Qualcomm has a multi-year agreement to supply chips to Apple and its next few generations of iPhone.

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