Fitbit trackers are great, but are they the be-all and end-all?

Fitbit has a growing line of fitness trackers and even a smart scale, but they're not the only company that produces these types of devices. There are many, many other fitness trackers and bands out there with their own apps and functions.

When selecting which one is the best for you and your lifestyle, it's best to consider the best of what's around. Here's our list of some of the top dogs!

Misfit Shine

Misfit Shine

The Misfit Shine is an elegant option when it comes to fitness trackers. It's a wearable with a minimalist design — it only has 12 LEDs on its face, that's it. It basically looks like a watch with no face. The Shine tracks multiple activities and sleep and syncs with its own proprietary app.

The good

The Misfit Shine leaves the Fitbit behind by tracking cycling, sports activities, swimming and more, all on top of steps, calories, and distance.

You read it right, the Shine tracks swimming. Unlike Fitbits, which are relatively water resistant, like in the shower or the rain, the Misfit Shine is water resistant to 50 meters. You can take it on your morning lap swim or the next time you go snorkeling (provided you didn't opt for a leather band).

Ditch the charging cables and the constant anticipation of your tracker dying on you, because the Misfit Shine takes a replaceable coin cell battery that lasts for up to six months.

The not so good

The Shine has a bit of a problem popping out of its band. Something so round in a material that can be pretty slippery at times doesn't always make for a snug fit.

The minimalist face doesn't display and data, so if you're really on the go, you'll have to juggle between the Shine and your smartphone, if you're wanting up-to-the-minute details.

The nitty gritty

The Misfit Shine is stylish and customizable with great features, so long as you have a compatible smartphone or tablet.

See at Amazon

Jawbone UP

Jawbone offers a more streamlined approach to fitness trackers with only three models on the market: The UP move, UP2, and UP3. Like Fitbit, Jawbone's line offers a clip-style option in the UP move, while the UP2 and 3 are customizable wristbands.

The good

The Jawbone UP line is incredibly customizable and stylish, offering a whole bunch of color combinations and band styles, so that your Jawbone can match your mood or activity. If you're out for a night on the town, but still want to monitor activity, there are elegant or edgy options for all.

Jawbone UP syncs with a whole slew of interesting apps, including the free Jawbone app, to make your fitness experience excited and nuanced.

Jawbone UP3 boasts a more accurate sleep tracker, using its technology to track resting and passive heart rate in order to paint a clearer picture of when you're sound asleep and when you're restless. This is best shown in its Smart Alarm feature, which claims to recognize the best moment in your sleep cycle to wake you, so that you feel refreshed instead of groggy.

The UP2 and 3 come with Idle Alert, which you can set to remind you to move when you know you may be a bit more sedentary. Fitbit is only just adding this feature to the forthcoming Alta.

The not so good

UP move, Jawbone's base model fitness tracker, offers an LED display complete with a clock, but the UP2 and UP3, considerably more expensive models, don't have displays of any sort, just little indicator lights.

Jawbone fitness trackers are only compatible with Android and Apple devices. Sorry Windows users, but Jawbone isn't the one for you. That being said, there are third-party Windows apps for Jawbone owners, so while support isn't official, it is there.

The nitty gritty

Jawbone offers you three simple yet very customizable options, so there's no overwhelming line up of different looking devices. They're reasonably priced, starting at $59.99 for the move, with the UP3 retailing for $199.99.

The higher-end models don't offer the interactivity that the higher-end Fitbit models offer, so if you're looking for a more integrated experience without having to pull out your smartphone, the Fitbit Surge or Blaze are still probably the better way to go.

See at Amazon

Garmin Vívo Fitness

Garmin Vívofit 2

Like Jawbone, Garmin offers only three choices when it comes to fitness trackers: the vívofit 2, vívosmart HR, and the vívoactive. Each boasts a long list of features and the vívofit 2, Garmin's base model, offers more than the Fitbit Flex, at the same price point of $99.99.

The good

The vívo fitness line all come with a Move Bar, which is like the Fitbit Alta's Reminder to Move. After an hour of inactivity, any of the three vívo fitness devices reminds you to get up and get moving for a bit. This makes them great if you sit at a desk all day long or happen to be on extended vacation and a little too in love with lounging.

The vívofit 2 boasts a year-long battery life. For a wristband that does significantly more than the Fitbit Zip — which only has a six-month battery life —that's pretty impressive.

One of the best features of the vívosmart HR and vívoactive is music player controls. You can change songs and control volume all from your wristband.

Each Garmin model has a backlit LED display, so when you go for a late evening jog, you'll be able to keep track of everything.

The not so good

Garmin doesn't exactly boast the prettiest line of wearable fitness trackers. Though they come in different colors, you can't swap in leather or metal bands. There really isn't anything elegant about the vívo fitness line, so they wouldn't exactly go with an evening gown.

The vívo fitness line is only compatible with the Garmin Connect app. It's essentially a social network and is available for Android, iPhone, and Windows Mobile, but that's all you get.

The nitty gritty

Garmin's vívo fitness line is easily navigable and each model brings a lot to the table, but their fitness-focused designs won't pair well with much in your wardrobe, aside from workout clothes.

See at Amazon

Apple Watch Sport

Apple Watch Sport

Apple Watch Sport is more than just Apple's answer to the fitness tracker craze — it's a full-fledged smartwatch with a corrosion-resistant anodized aluminum body and sweat-resistant fluoroelastomer band.

The good

The Apple Watch Sport is the baseline model for the Apple Watch line, so you have all the functionality of the Apple Watch and compatible apps without the top-of-the-line price tag.

All of your fitness tracking is completely synced with you iPhone all the time. Unlike Fitbit, where you have to go in to the Fitbit app and manually sync or turn on All Day Sync, Apple Watch just communicates everything directly to your iPhone and you can move seamlessly between the two.

Since you have all of the Apple Watch functionality, you can answer calls and texts, thanks to Siri access and your handy Earpods.

The not so good

The price. When it comes to buying a fitness tracker, solely for the sake of it tracking fitness, Apple Watch Sport is, in some cases, $200 more than competing trackers with the similar fitness same features (but, again, this is more than just a fitness tracker).

It's a little clunkier than some of the more cleanly-designed fitness trackers, like the Fitbit Flex. If you were to go with the Fitbit Blaze or Surge, you'd be in the same boat, but the issue is that the watch is the only option when it comes to an Apple-branded fitness tracker.

Of course, Apple Watch Sport only works with the iPhone, so if you have something else, no dice.

The nitty gritty

The Apple Watch Sport is highly functional and relatively customizable, but it's rather expensive because it's not just a fitness tracker.

See at Amazon

Microsoft Band

The Microsoft Band is akin to the Apple Watch Sport, but errs more on the side of fitness tracker that smart watch. It can receive text notifications and view email previews, while tracking your steps, heart rate, calories burned, and more. Pair it with your Windows 10 Mobile phone to view all your data in the Windows Health app.

The good

Funnily enough, the Microsoft band isn't just for Windows phones. It can be paired with iPhones and many Android devices.

The Microsoft Band has 11 built-in sensors, including a barometer, heart rate monitor, and even a UV monitor. If you want to see how your environment affects your workouts, this is the fitness tracker for you.

You can tailor the way Microsoft Band tracks you, so that whether you're running, biking, playing golf, or lifting weights, you're always getting the most accurate picture of your level of fitness.

The not so good

The Microsoft Band is probably the clunkiest fitness tracker of any we've discussed so far. It looks the most like a gadget and is considerably less comfortable than anything Fitbit has to offer.

Just like the Apple Watch Sport, the Microsoft Band is expensive if you're just looking for a fitness tracker. At $329.99, it's still $80 more than the most expensive Fitbit.

The nitty gritty

At the end of the day, the Microsoft Band has a long way to go before it can compete with Fitbit, purely in a value-for-fitness-tracker capacity, but if you want a smart watch that can pair with multiple platforms and has a built-in tracker, then it's not the worst choice.

See at Amazon

UA Band by Under Armour

UA Band

HTC partnered with Under Armour to bring about the Under Armour Health Box, which contains, among other things, the UA Band, which does everything most Fitbits can do, along with a couple extra features.

The good

The UA Band is designed to be worn by athletes, so it's sleek and sexy, while still being comfortable and sporty-looking. The display can stay on during workouts, so there's no need to be constantly tapping or pushing buttons.

Music control is boon to the UA Band because hey, who likes reaching into their sweaty pockets for their smart phone and having to jam the cord back in every time, just because you wanted to switch songs or jack up the volume for MAXIMUM INTENSITY? We don't.

Though also available separately, the UA Band works in tandem with the rest of the Health Box, which includes a scale and a chest-strap heart rate monitor, so you have this complete system of fitness tracking at your disposal.

The not so good

The UA Band isn't customizable. It only comes in black with red on the inside of the band. That's it.

The built-in heart rate monitor can only measure resting heart rate. For higher intensity workouts, you need the UA Heart Rate, which straps around your chest. Sure, it's probably pretty accurate, but who wants to strap the thing to their chest for every workout?

The UA Band syncs with UA Record, which is only available for iOS and Android, so the Windows folks are out again.

The whole UA Health Box will run you around $400. 'Nuff said.

The nitty gritty

The UA Band doesn't really bring too much to the table that other fitness trackers of its ilk do. At $180, it's relatively reasonable, but there isn't much point in having a heart rate monitor that only tracks resting heart rate.

See at Under Armour

Moto 360 Sport

Moto 360 Sport

The Moto 360 Sport is Motorola's foray into the fitness tracker market. It isn't, however, just a fitness tracker — it's a full-on Android Wear smart watch.

The good

The best part of the Moto 360 Sport is its Wi-Fi connectivity. Your phone doesn't need to be near you, so long as both devices are connected to Wi-Fi. No more giant phone waggling around the pockets of your shorts while you run.

You're jogging and love the park you're running through, but don't know its name. Boom. Moto 360 has built-in GPS.

The Moto 360 Sport is water resistant up to three feet deep for 30 minutes, so there's no worry if you drop it in a shallow puddle or happen to get caught in a monsoon.

The not so good

If you're looking for something that's sole use is fitness tracking, the Moto 360 is pricey. Though not as pricey as other smart watches we've discussed, at $299.99, that's still a lotta cashola.

Due to the material, the strap on this sucker picks up dust and fluff like nobody's business. So, if you have a cat or play with Swiffers for a living, you're gonna have a bad time.

The battery life of the Moto 360 Sport is abysmal compared to Fitbit. The 360 Sport is said to last up to only a day when the display is on Ambient. It is a smart watch, but if you're just using it for fitness and happen to be on a two-day hike, you're outta luck.

The nitty gritty

The Moto 360 Sport boasts the best all-in-one fitness features of any of the smart watch/fitness tracker hybrids discussed, like its built-in GPS, heart rate monitor, light-sensing display, and music controls.

But, as a fitness tracker on its own, it's a bit expensive and attracts dust like a moth to a flame. There's also the issue of having to charge it every night.

See at Amazon

To Fitbit or not to Fitbit

From beginners to those in advanced stages of training, Fitbit seems to have the best range of models that suit the different levels of fitness and fitness enthusiasm. While there are many other options, there aren't many that cater to novices of this type of technology.