Apple SVP of Internet Software and Services, Eddy Cue, recently sat down for a wide-ranging interview on innovation in TV, Apple's foray into original video, and more. The Hollywood Reporter also specifically asked Cue about a potential Apple TV streaming service, and while he wasn't exactly forthcoming, he did say that what was more important was that these services were available on Apple platforms.

Eddy Cue talks Apple's TV efforts, cable bundles, and more

Cue also took on the notion of the so-called "skinny bundle" TV services, which offers a slim selection of channels for less money, and why people might not actually like them. From The Hollywood reporter:

They're not getting the features that they want. The fact that I have to set things to record seems idiotic. And channel guides — I get home and I want to watch a Duke basketball game; why do I have to go hunting to find out what channel it's on? Why can't I just say, "I want to watch Duke basketball." Or, even better, why doesn't the system know that? "Here's the Duke basketball game." Those technical capabilities exist today. They just don't exist for television.

The big issue, says Cue, isn't that people have access to content they don't want, but that they have too hard a time getting to it. With the rise of streaming video and interactive TV content, Cue wants to see more innovation in actually getting people to the content they care about.

Cue also addressed Apple's explorations into original video programming, such as the upcoming show Planet of the Apps. He says that Apple isn't looking to actually create its own shows, but it will help out where it makes sense.

It's his show, but we felt we could help. We felt like there were things that he wanted to do in the show that, if we helped him with it, it would be way better or only possible if we did it. And that's the reason we got involved, because we actually think we bring something to the table.

Despite recent rumors, Cue also says that Apple is not in talks to buy a Hollywood studio.

You can check out the rest of the interview over at The Hollywood Reporter.