Skip to main content

Apple CEO Tim Cook spending hours practicing ahead of Epic court appearance

Tim Cook People
Tim Cook People (Image credit: Brooks Kraft/Apple)

What you need to know

  • Tim Cook will take to the stand later this week or at the beginning of the next.
  • Cook is said to be spending hours practicing ahead of his time in court.

Apple's Tim Cook will take the stand in the Epic Games trial later this week or early next, with the notoriously well-prepared CEO said to be undergoing hours of practice so he's ready.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Cook has former prosecutors grilling him as part of the practice rounds, all with the aim of trying to simulate what Cook will have to deal with when he takes the stand.

His testimony is likely to be the most detailed public discussion he will give on a subject that is likely to loom over Apple for years to come. Mr. Cook has been preparing for the trial, according to a person familiar with his effort. That has included hours of practice rounds from former prosecutors chosen by his legal team to simulate the witness stand.

Cook won't be the only high-profile appearance, though. Both Phil Schiller and Craig Federighi are expected to give evidence this week ahead of Cook's 100-minute-long testimony.

Apple's former marketing chief ‌Phil Schiller‌, now a company fellow, and Craig Federighi, head of software, are likely witnesses this week while Mr. Cook, who is scheduled to be on the stand for a total of 100 minutes, is expected toward the end of the week or early next week, as the trial in Oakland, Calif., looks to wrap up.

Cook's appearance will be one of the rare occasions he doesn't have any control over the questions being put to him, hence the practice sessions. Epic Games still believes that Apple's App Store processes and rules are anti-competitive and that's where the trial originally came from – after Epic broke the rules on purpose so it could get Fortnite kicked out. Apple is expected to come out on top in the law court, but it's a different matter in the court of public opinion.

Oliver Haslam
Contributor

Oliver Haslam has written about Apple and the wider technology business for more than a decade with bylines on How-To Geek, PC Mag, iDownloadBlog, and many more. He has also been published in print for Macworld, including cover stories. At iMore, Oliver is involved in daily news coverage and, not being short of opinions, has been known to 'explain' those thoughts in more detail, too.

Having grown up using PCs and spending far too much money on graphics card and flashy RAM, Oliver switched to the Mac with a G5 iMac and hasn't looked back. Since then he's seen the growth of the smartphone world, backed by iPhone, and new product categories come and go. Current expertise includes iOS, macOS, streaming services, and pretty much anything that has a battery or plugs into a wall. Oliver also covers mobile gaming for iMore, with Apple Arcade a particular focus. He's been gaming since the Atari 2600 days and still struggles to comprehend the fact he can play console quality titles on his pocket computer.

1 Comment
  • This isn't news unless you don't know the first thing about how the trial system works. It would be legal malpractice to let any key witness, even the plaintiff in a parking lot slip and fall, take the stand without hours of prep work. Every trial lawyer worth even their most basic salt does this, and Apple's lawyers are among the best available.