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Apple settles Powerbeats 2 lawsuit for nearly $10M over defect

Powerbeats
Powerbeats (Image credit: Apple)

What you need to know

  • Apple has settled a lawsuit over its Powerbeats 2.
  • It has agreed to pay a total of $9,750,000 dollars over a defect in the product.
  • Owners who bought the product in the U.S. might get a small payout.

Apple has settled a lawsuit over its Powerbeats 2 product for just shy of $10 million, over claims the product had a defect that would cause them to stop working after "mininal usage."

As MacRumors reports:

Plaintiffs alleged that Apple misrepresented the battery life of the Powerbeats 2, and that the Powerbeats 2 were sweat and water resistant. Apple was also accused of not repairing or replacing defective Powerbeats 2 within the one-year warranty period, with the lawsuit initially filed in 2017.

Apple has now agreed to settle the claim by paying out a total of $9.75M, but denies the allegation that it misrepresented the headphones' battery life, and that they were sweat and water resistant. It was also accused of not fulfilling the one-year warranty that came with the product. Members of the class action lawsuit could be entitled to a payout, and the money will be split between all the members of the class.

According to the settlement website:

You may be entitled to settlement benefits if you are a person residing in the United States who purchased Powerbeats 2 earphones not for resale before August 7, 2020.

Anyone who may have bought Powerbeats 2 before August 7 can fill out a claim for settlement on the website. The deadline for such a claim is November 20, 2020. Class members can also write to object to the settlement or to exclude themselves from the settlement by this date. A fairness hearing will take place in January of next year.

Stephen Warwick
News Editor

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.