Skip to main content

Apple sued in Spain, Belgium over 'batterygate' by EU consumer group

iPhone Battery
iPhone Battery (Image credit: Rene Ritchie / iMore)

What you need to know

  • An EU consumer group has filed lawsuits against Apple in Spain and Belgium over batterygate.
  • The suits allege that measures included in iOS by Apple to limit performance in order to preserve battery amount to 'planned obsolescence.'

A group of EU consumers has filed class-action lawsuits against Apple in both Spain and Belgium over the iPhone slowdown scandal, more commonly known as 'batterygate'.

In a press release Wednesday the group stated:

Euroconsumers, the world's leading consumer cluster organization, today announced it has filed two class-action lawsuits against Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) over the planned obsolescence of Apple iPhones. The lawsuits cover owners of iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6S and 6S Plus and alleges Apple engaged in unfair and misleading commercial practices. The lawsuits ask for compensation of on average at least 60 euro for each affected consumer in Belgium and Spain.

Apple settled 'batterygate' in the US at the cost of around 500 million dollars, over claims that features included in its iOS software limited the performance of the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s Plus, and iPhone SE in order to preserve battery life in the phone. Apple has always maintained that the feature prevents unexpected shutdowns and battery loss at the cost of limited performance.

The group, Euroconsumers, cites this settlement and a similar Italian settlement, as well as a more recent settlement with 33 U.S. states and the District of California.

In a statement, Els Bruggeman, head of Policy and Enforcement at Euroconsumers said "consumers are increasingly upset by products wearing out too quickly, the iPhone 6 models being a very concrete example of that." Bruggeman said the issue caused frustration and financial harm and was "utterly irresponsible" from an environmental point of view. The suits were filed after Euroconsumers sent a cease-and-desist letter to Apple earlier in the year demanding it ends the practice.

Stephen Warwick
News Editor

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.

1 Comment
  • Really? Adjusting the power envelope so that the phones could last all day and not exhibit random shutdowns is 'planned obsolescence', and environmentally irresponsible? Leaving the phones the way they were would have pushed users to upgrade sooner. These were on phones typically well out of warranty.