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Astropad Studio now supports Windows in latest beta

Astropad
Astropad (Image credit: astropad)

What you need to know

  • Astropad Studio now supports Windows.
  • The new 'Project Blue' beta lets you use an iPad and Apple Pencil as a drawing tablet for Windows.

A new beta of the popular AstroPad Studio brings with it support for Windows, meaning you can use your iPad and Apple Pencil as a drawing pad on a Windows PC.

The company stated:

Project Blue goes beyond a basic drawing tablet. Featuring a robust sidebar and on-screen UI, you can quickly access your favorite shortcuts and customize your drawing preferences.— Because when it comes to your creative workflow, we know that no two artists work alike.

Astropad Studio has been used by Star Wars, Nintendo, Pixar, and Disney, and is a well-established drawing companion for the Mac. Now, the fun comes to Windows, specifically Windows 10. You'll need the 64-bit version, build 1809 or later, as well as an iPad running iOS 9.1 or later, and an Apple Pencil.

Initially, the beta will include support for drawing tablet functionality including mirroring and touch support, as well as the Apple Pencil, and Astropad Studio's many shortcuts and customizations. Coming soon is expansions to shortcuts, more customization, and performance enhancements like Luna Display integration so you can use your iPad as a second display for your Windows device. Currently, the beta support either Wi-Fi or USB connectivity and low latency at 60fps, with more latency reductions to come later on.

The app can be used with any application such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and more, and has been optimized for drawing with the Apple Pencil.

You can sign up for the Project Blue Beta by going to the Astropad website now.

Stephen Warwick
Stephen Warwick

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.

1 Comment
  • Seems like an odd target market. If you have the requirement to draw on Windows, why not just buy a windows convertible or 2-1? Why buy a non-touch/pen Windows PC and then an iPad. Then why not a Wacom tablet. I get why sidecar exists for the Mac.