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This new iOS 16 feature will kill passwords forever, according to Apple

Ios 16 Iphone 13 Pro Hero
(Image credit: Christine Romero-Chan / iMore)

Apple is ready to get rid of passwords with the introduction of passkeys. The new iOS 16 (opens in new tab) feature was first announced at this year's WWDC, and now Apple executives are sharing more about it.

In a recent interview with Tom's Guide, Kurt Knight, senior director of platform product marketing at Apple, and Darin Adler, VP of internet technologies at Apple, discussed the game-changing new feature and how it could make passwords obsolete sooner rather than later.

According to Apple (opens in new tab), passkeys will be easier to use than regular passwords and will provide additional security to users. Switching to passkeys will offer a super simple and secure way to sign into apps and websites across platforms — without needing to type in a password. While this may sound similar to a password management system, like 1Password, it's actually completely different. With passkeys, users won't need to create or manage passwords ever again.

But how do passkeys work?

Apple's passkeys will use Touch ID or Face ID for biometric verification. Passkeys will be synced with iCloud Keychain, which will make them available across Apple devices, including iPhone, iPad, Mac, and Apple TV with end-to-end encryption.

“[Since] people almost always have phones with them, Face ID and Touch ID verification [will] give you the convenience and biometrics we can achieve with an iPhone," Adler said. "You don't have to buy another device, but also you don't even have to learn a new habit."

Passkeys feature on Mac.

(Image credit: Apple)

Additionally, passkeys will make it almost impossible for phishers to gain access to your accounts because of the technology behind the feature. Apple explains that passkeys will be "intrinsically linked with the app or website they were created for, so people can never be tricked into using their passkey to sign in to a fraudulent app or website."

And when it comes to being in the iCloud Keychain, passkeys are end-to-end encrypted, so even Apple can’t read them.

Adler also noted that Apple's developers are ready to go with passkeys. He said users will have all the support they need when the company officially launches its new software, which is expected to happen in September with Apple's next best iPhone, the iPhone 14.

“This isn't a future dream to replace passwords,” Knight added. "This is something that's going to be a road to completely replace passwords, and it's starting now."

Stephanie Barnes is a contributor at iMore. She fell in love with technology after building her first PC as a little girl. She later followed that passion to become a front-end/iOS engineer before switching to writing full-time. Stephanie's writing on technology, health and wellness, movies, television, and much more can be found all over the internet, including at HuffPost, HelloGiggles, PopSci, MindBodyGreen, and Business Insider.

At iMore, she covers everything from breaking news to product roundups with the latest and greatest devices, apps, and accessories on the market. Stephanie also writes the occasional how-to guide to help readers get the most out of their Apple's devices and services.