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Stunning new 'After Steve' book promises unseen look inside Apple

After Steve Book
After Steve Book (Image credit: iMore)

What you need to know

  • A brand new book about Tim Cook and Apple debuts today.
  • 'After Steve' is a book by Tripp Mickle.
  • It promises to reveal "How Apple Became a Trillion-Dollar Company and Lost Its Soul" with incredible new insight and great stories.

A brand new book debuting today promises readers a fresh inside look at one of the world's most secretive companies, and sets out to tell the story of "How Apple Became a Trillion-Dollar Company and Lost Its Soul."

Authored by the Wall Street Journal's Tripp Mickle, the new book is a 500-page look at the relationship between Jony Ive and Tim Cook as they tried to steer the company through the days and months after the passing of Steve Jobs. From the publisher:

Steve Jobs called Jony Ive his "spiritual partner at Apple." The London-born genius was the second-most powerful person at Apple and the creative force who most embodies Jobs's spirit, the man who designed the products adopted by hundreds of millions the world over: the iPod, iPad, MacBook Air, the iMac G3, and the iPhone. In the wake of his close collaborator's death, the chief designer wrestled with grief and initially threw himself into his work designing the new Apple headquarters and the Watch before losing his motivation in a company increasingly devoted more to margins than to inspiration.

Standout stories from the work include work on developing the Apple Watch as the company moved into luxury goods and high fashion, including a $25M tent that may have been the beginning of the end for Ive's time at Apple. It also examines the tension between Tim and Jony's philosophies of operations and cost over design and materials, Scott Forstall and Apple Maps, Jony's move to software design, Apple's fight with the FBI, Tim Cook's deft politics in China, and the U.S., services like Apple Music, why Apple bought Beats, and even Apple Car.

Speaking to over 200 current and former employees and other key figures, the book may be one of the most important works ever penned about the famed Cupertino company.

Stephen Warwick
News Editor

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.

3 Comments
  • "How Apple Became a Trillion-Dollar Company and Lost Its Soul". Hmm. No agenda here. “…before losing his motivation in a company increasingly devoted more to margins than to inspiration.” Because being successful and making money for shareholders is SUCH a Bad Thing. 🙄
  • I would interested in seeing what this book has to share. I doubt there will be any deep. "secrets", but I'll bet there are some personal passages that add value to the stories. I have seen it all. I have been an Apple employee, shareholder, customer, and reseller, at various times in my life. I left working there because of the company's steering away from excellence towards profit, but that occurred during Steve's tenure, not just Tim's. As a shareholder, and fan of the company, I am pleased to see them succeed financially beyond anyone's expectations. I was an employee when they nearly went bankrupt. But, I could not stay after they got too focused on profit. When I first joined, Steve's mantra was "Build great products and delight the customer. The sales will take care of themselves." I miss that...
  • Written by a Wall Street Journal journalist so I don't trust a single word of it. They don't have the best track record of honest reporting when it comes to Apple.