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Top 5 reasons to switch to Microsoft Edge for Mac (and one reason not to)

Microsoft Edge
Microsoft Edge (Image credit: iMore)

The new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge offers a fresh take on web browsing and is available across multiple platforms, including macOS. If you're looking for reasons to switch from the increasingly stale Apple Safari on your Mac, you've come to the right place. Here are five reasons to make the switch, and one reason maybe you shouldn't.

Flexible privacy settings

Web trackers collect data about how you interact with a site. By doing so, they can offer web content and ads customized for your benefit. Unfortunately, some web trackers have been designed to harm. Microsoft Edge addresses good and bad web trackers in a way that other browsers do not. Rather than taking an all-or-nothing approach, the browser offers you three levels of tracking prevention for which to choose.

Under the Basic setting, Microsoft blocks trackers it thinks are potentially harmful while allowing others that are intended to personalize your web content and ads. With the Microsoft-recommended Balanced approach, the browser blocks harmful trackers and those from sites you haven't visited. More security, however, means you'll receive a less robust and personalized experience compared to the Basic option.

With Strict tracking, Microsoft blocks harmful trackers and the majority of all trackers across most sites. Under this scenario, your surfing experience becomes even less personalized. Depending on the site, the limit could also disable video and login capabilities.

Customizable tab page

When you open a new tab in Apple Safari, you see a dreary page with links to your favorite and frequently visited web pages. On Microsoft Edge tabs, you're welcomed with beautiful photos of the California redwoods, wintertime in Geneva, Switzerland, and muskoxen in Alaska. There's also a Microsoft Bing web search box, Microsoft News, and yes, quick links to your most visited web sites.

Apple Safari vs. Microsoft Edge

Apple Safari vs. Microsoft Edge (Image credit: iMore)

At launch, the Microsoft Edge tab page can match one of three canned layouts or you can make it your own by creating a more customized version. My favorite is the informational layout, which you can see above.

See the difference? Of course, you can!

Easy set up and import

The Windows maker really wants you to embrace Microsoft Edge as a Mac user. So much so, it's made it oh-so-simple to set up and begin using. Once you start the browser for the first, you'll be asked to import your previous browser settings. For Apple Safari, it will import favorites, bookmarks, and browsing history. For Google Chrome, it will also import payment and password information, addresses, settings, and more.

Broad availability

The new version of Microsoft Edge is available across multiple platforms, including macOS, iOS, iPadOS, Windows, and Android. Like you can do on Apple Safari with iCloud, with a universal Microsoft Account, you can sync your Microsoft Edge favorites, settings, addresses, passwords, and much more, across all of these platforms.

Coming soon, you'll also get to sync your history, open tabs, and extensions.

Extensions and more extensions

Microsoft Explorer was the first web browser to support extensions. Since then, these mostly free plug-ins have come to Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, Google Chrome, and other browsers.

Microsoft Edge extensions

Microsoft Edge extensions (Image credit: iMore)

Because Microsoft Edge is based on the Chromium source-code, you can grab web extensions from Microsoft's online store and also the Chrome Web Store. The compatibility means you again instant access to over 190,000 browser extensions. As a comparison, Apple Safari currently offers less than 100 extensions. Sad, no?

But, remember this

Speaking of iCloud, this is one area where using Microsoft Edge over Apple Safari could prove problematic if you're a heavily user. One of the advantages of using Apple Safari is that your web usernames and passwords sync across multiple devices using the iCloud Keychain. You can do the same through Microsoft Edge, but there's no easy way to import the old from the new.

In the iCloud Keychain, I have nearly 800 username/password combinations. Let's assume that half of these are either outdated or no longer needed. That's still a lot of information that I cannot carry over to a new browser.

There's also the issue of Apple Pay. In recent years, I've enjoy the option of being able to make payments through web sites using this tool. On Microsoft Edge, it's not an option.

Of course, there's a work around for both of these problems: I can continue using Apple Safari when necessary. True, but that doesn't make sense over the long term.

Go for it

I've been playing around with Microsoft Edge on my Mac for many months during the public beta process. It's not a perfect browser, but in some respects it's much better than Apple Safari. Competition is usually good for everyone. In this case, I hope Apple learns some things from Microsoft Edge and revamps its browser, which has been slowly losing ground to Google Chrome. It will be interesting to see where the browser market goes in the coming weeks and months.

Bryan M Wolfe
Bryan M Wolfe

Bryan M. Wolfe has written about technology for over a decade on various websites, including TechRadar, AppAdvice, and many more. Before this, he worked in the technology field across different industries, including healthcare and education. He’s currently iMore’s lead on all things Mac and macOS, although he also loves covering iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. Bryan enjoys watching his favorite sports teams, traveling, and driving around his teenage daughter to her latest stage show, audition, or school event in his spare time. He also keeps busy walking his black and white cocker spaniel, Izzy, and trying new coffees and liquid grapes.

6 Comments
  • The biggest problem with Safari is one which most users won't notice, they simply refuse to support a lot of web standards. I visit a small forum where avatars are displayed in WEBP format, and they simply don't show on Safari. There are also a lot of videos shared on the forum which are in codecs that Safari doesn't support. There's a lot of other things they don't support as well, and it's a shame, it's a good browser apart from that. In terms of iCloud Keychain or any browser's login saving ability, I prefer to use a standalone password manager. It can store passwords that are not webpage logins, and because it's standalone it's really easy to use with any browser, simply download their browser extension and you have all your logins/passwords
  • Ummm mm, no.
  • Why not? I didn't used to be a big fan of Microsoft, although some of their more recent applications have been good, I'm using Outlook on iOS and Microsoft Edge on my Mac, plus I use VS Code for development which is a godsend. Their to-do app is pretty good as well, although I prefer using "Things" for my to-do lists
  • It is quite easy to forget that with any 3rd party web browser, whether it be Firefox, Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi, or now Microsoft EDGE, on iOS you really are not using any of these other browsers. You are using Safari with an UI overlay, not the browser's normal components, so you really aren't gaining anything by using them. On the desktop I love these alternative browsers, each has its own merits and functionality that works really well for me. But on iOS, it really makes no difference which one you use.
  • Good point. This article is about the Mac, Microsoft Edge has been on iOS for a lot longer, but like you said they're all just Safari with a different UI. The main reason for using an alternative browser on iOS at the moment is for the syncing features that link with the desktop version
  • Want to know the best thing about edge? it's nothing technical. It's Microsoft points. I collect enough points just doing my everyday business on my computer to get a gas card about every 3 months. I don't get anything from any other browser etc. I use edge on everything.