Camera Tips

How to replace the rear iSight camera in an iPhone 5

The iPhone 5 comes equipped with an 8 megapixel rear iSight camera. It's a great camera, as long as it's functioning properly. However, if you're experiencing issues with your rear camera and you're out of warranty, replacing it yourself could be a lot cheaper than a new iPhone. Symptoms could include a black screen, hazing in images, spots showing up in photos, or lines through photos. If any of these problems sound like something you've experienced, it may be time to DIY replace your camera.

More →

7
loading...
0
loading...
39
loading...
0
loading...

How to take panoramas with your iPhone

Panorama mode on the iPhone Camera lets you capture much wider, much higher megapixel photos than are otherwise possible with the built in iSight lens. By taking a video-like stream of successive frames, the iPhone can literally match and stitch together a single photo greater than the sum of its parts. First introduced with iOS 6 and the iPhone 4, the current version can even make use of Apple's powerful image signal processor (ISP) to dynamically expose the entire image and make it look great from light to dark. Here's how it works!

More →

27
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...

How to use the HDR camera on your iPhone or iPad

High dynamic range (HDR) involves using the Camera app to take a series of photos in rapid succession, at least one of which is under exposed and at least one of which is over exposed. Those photos are then all combined resulting in a single, unified image that shows details both in the shadow and the light. The results are landscapes that aren't lost to darkness and skies that aren't all blown out. Apple has provided an HDR mode on the iPhone for years, and more recently has provided not only an HDR mode for the iPad, but an automatic HDR mode for the iPhone 5s.

More →

13
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...

How to use the True Tone camera flash on your iPhone

More →

0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...

How to use live camera filters on your iPhone

Apple has added basic color and effect filters to both the Camera and Photos app on the iPhone. The new filters apply to the still and square cameras. They don't apply to the video or panorama cameras. If you apply one, they're live and you'll see them in the preview the way they'll look when the photo is taken. They're subtle, as filters go. Mono, Tonal, Noir, Fade, Chrome, Process, Transfer, and Instant. There are three types of black and white, one desaturated, one over saturated, and and one each that tint towards blue, red, and green. Nothing blown out, nothing vignetted, and nothing overly dramatic. Best of all, they're easy to use!

More →

0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...

How to use the camera grid on your iPhone or iPad

The iPhone and iPad Camera app allows you to optionally turn on grid lines so you can better frame people and objects, horizons and celestial bodies in your photos. Using the rules of thirds can elevate your photos from the ordinary to the extra ordinary. From snapshots to photographic art. And all with the flip of a toggle!

More →

5
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...

How to start using the camera app on iPhone or iPad

iOS 7 has brought with it some dramatic changes to several native apps and the Camera app is no exception. Outside of being able to take still photos, panoramas, and record video just like you could before, you've got some additional options to choose from now. The way you switch between modes has also been changed up a bit.

Here's everything you need to know about changing settings, switching modes, and applying filters in the all new Camera app in iOS 7:

More →

5
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...
0
loading...

How to make your iPhone photographs more powerful with negative space

The placement of your subject or subjects is incredibly important when it comes to creating powerful iPhone photo compositions, but just as important is everything around and between them -- the negative space. We started out our iPhoneography series by introducing the rule of thirds. Now we're going to explore that other two thirds, how it defines the forms, leads the eye, and helps create more balanced, more visually interesting work.

More →

13
loading...
0
loading...
223
loading...
0
loading...

How to get started with iPhone photography

Everything you need to know about using your iPhone Camera to take great, memorable photos

With the new iPhone photography -- or iPhoneography -- series we're running on iMore, we have a lot of new iPhones users, and burgeoning photographers joining us. So, Leanna and I thought it would be a good idea to team up, take a moment, and go over the basics so that everyone gets up to speed just as quickly as possible.

More →

34
loading...
0
loading...
218
loading...
0
loading...

How to make your iPhone photography more striking with the "rule of thirds"

One of the most important, yet most difficult, elements in creating beautiful photographs is composition - where your subject is placed and how it's related to its surroundings. A great starting point for developing this skill is to understand the rule of thirds.

More →

25
loading...
44
loading...
184
loading...
0
loading...

Pages