Camera Tips

How to use the panorama camera on your iPhone

The Camera app on the iPhone lets you capture panoramas — much wider, much higher megapixel photos than are otherwise possible with the built in iSight lens. By taking a video-like stream of successive frames, the iPhone can literally create single photo greater than the sum of its parts. You can take a "pano" from either left to right or right to left, and you can even rotate your iPhone and take one from up to down or down to up. With iOS 8, panoramas will also be coming to the iPad!

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How to use the HDR camera on your iPhone or iPad

The Camera on your iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad lets you take high dynamic range (HDR) photos. HDR involves taking a series of photos in rapid succession, at least one of which is under exposed and at least one of which is over exposed. Those photos are then all combined resulting in a single, unified image that shows details both in the shadow and the light. The results are landscapes that aren't lost to darkness and skies that aren't all blown out. Apple has provided an HDR mode on the iPhone for years, and more recently has provided not only an HDR mode for the iPad, but an automatic HDR mode for the iPhone 5s.

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How to use the camera flash on your iPhone

The Camera app can not only take photos, it can take flash photos when there's not enough light for anything else. Make no mistake — mobile flash photography still stinks no matter the quality of the tiny elements involved. However, whether you have a single or dual LED on your iPhone camera, they can help you capture important moments at low-light levels that would otherwise be impossible. So, to get the best photo you can, regardless of whether the you'e facing twilight to incandescence, tungsten or florescent, something cool blue or warm yellow, or any combination in between, you can set up and use the iPhone flash.

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How to use live camera filters on your iPhone

Apple has added basic color and effect filters to both the Camera and Photos app on the iPhone. The new filters apply to the still and square cameras. They don't apply to the video or panorama cameras. If you apply one, they're live and you'll see them in the preview the way they'll look when the photo is taken. They're subtle, as filters go. Mono, Tonal, Noir, Fade, Chrome, Process, Transfer, and Instant. There are three types of black and white, one desaturated, one over saturated, and and one each that tint towards blue, red, and green. Nothing blown out, nothing vignetted, and nothing overly dramatic. Best of all, they're easy to use!

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How to turn photo geotagging on or off on your iPhone or iPad

When you launch the Camera app on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad for the first time it'll ask you if it can use your location. That uses Wi-Fi router mapping, and, if available, cell-tower triangulation and GPS to determine where you are and record that information along with the photo. In other words — geotagging. It's great if you want to keep track of where you took your pictures, like on a photo walk or a vacation, but if you want to protect your privacy and keep your location undisclosed, it's not so good. Luckily, even if you allowed location the first time, you can change your mind at any time.

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How to enable the camera grid on your iPhone or iPad

The Camera app on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad has an optional grid that can help you better frame people, pets, and objects, horizons and celestial bodies — pretty much anything at all in your photos. Using the rules of thirds can elevate your pictures from the ordinary to the extra ordinary, and all with the flip of a toggle!

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How to record slow motion videos on your iPhone

The Camera app on the iPhone 5s can not only record video but it can record 120 frames-per-second (fps) slow motion video as well. Slow motion video means just what you'd expect — everything recorded moves more slowly, but still smoothly. It's like the effects you see in movies and on TV. Better still, Apple lets you quickly and easily set in and out points for the slow down effect at any time, so you can make sure your video only goes slow, and stays slow, for the precise moments you want.

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How to take photos with your iPhone or iPad

The Camera app on the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad means you're never more than a swipe or tap or two from taking a picture and capturing a magic moment. While the camera app might look simple, there's a lot going on inside. It has auto-focus and auto-exposure, and both can be changed with just a tap of the screen. There are also options for high dynamic range (HDR), to switch between rear-facing and front-facing cameras, and even live filters and burst mode.

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How to record a video with your iPhone or iPad

The Camera app on the iPhone and iPad isn't just for taking still shots. With access to both the 1080p iSight camera on the back and the 720p FaceTime camera on the front, it's also great for shooting video of everything and anything, from sports to kids to pets to breaking news to moving selfies.

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iPhone photography: The ultimate guide

While the original iPhone camera was nothing to write home about, the current iPhone camera is something to never leave home without. If the best camera is the one you have with you, then whether you're shooting pictures of sunsets or sports cars, family or friends, pets or national parks, you still want to get the best iPhone photos possible.

That's where iMore's iPhoneography series comes in, and that's what we're collecting together here, in one convenient, highly-bookmarkable place. We'll continue to expand this guide to include even more awesome iPhone photography tutorials, but here's everything you need to know to get started.

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