Malware

No, Apple doesn't need to 'open up' to malware fear-mongers

Earlier this week the CEO of an anti-virus company wrote a "guest editorial" on a popular technology website, saying it was time for Apple to "open up" and — wait for it — allow anti-virus software on the iPhone and iPad. The premise is self-serving and the headline spit-take inducing, and it's absolutely not worth rewarding negative attention seeking with attention. However, it is important to address the fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD) the "guest editorial" is trying to spread.

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Apple's malware definitions updated to protect Macs against iWorm

Apple has updated its malware definitions for OS X so as to defend Macs against a botnet that allowed a piece of malware called Mac.BackDoor.iWorm to install on systems. iWorm had made its way onto 17,000 machines by the time it was disclosed last week. Once on a user's system, the malware could install other pieces of malware, in addition to stealing sensitive data. Apple has now taken steps to protect its users from iWorm, according to MacRumors:

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'BadUSB' malware highlights the danger of plugging random mystery drives into your computer

Another day, another apocalyptic prognostication of computer security doom, this time focusing on the omnipresent USB connection. It's called 'BadUSB', and it's a malware proof-of-concept created by security researchers Karsten Nohl and Jakob Lell that exploits a flaw in and resides in the firmware that controls the basic function of USB devices. The researchers claim that it's not a problem that can be patched, saying that they're "exploiting the very way that USB is designed," but in the end all they've done is highlight that you shouldn't go around plugging USB drives, devices, or whatnot that you don't trust into your computer.

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Older Mac webcams can spy on you, but don't tape yours over until you read this

Two researchers at Johns Hopkins University published a paper that has recently been widely reported throughout the Mac blogosphere. They claim to have been able to hack the webcam on older MacBook and iMac computers so the camera worked without activating the green LED. Don't tape over your webcam yet, though. I've had a look over the paper, and it's not as bad as you might think.

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iOS malware injecting charger to be presented at Black Hat

Three researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology are scheduled to give a talk at the 2013 Black Hat security conference on iOS malware injection using malicious chargers. While the full details of the exploit won’t be revealed until the talk this July, the researchers have said that their method works on the latest version of iOS and does not require a jailbreak.

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iOS app flagged for malware, and why you shouldn't worry

An iOS game called Simply Find It, when run through BitDefender’s virus scanner, reportedly returns a positive result for Trojan.JS.iframe.BKD. This has drawn into question the effectiveness of Apple’s App Store approval process. Is this something that Apple should have caught, and is it something App Store customers should be worried about?

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Phil Schiller tweets link to mobile malware report that highlights Android security threats

Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller has taken to Twitter to poke fun at Android over malware issues. Schiller simply tweeted “Be safe out there” and linked to the Mobile Threat Report from Q4 2012 from F-Secure, which talks about security issues in mobile software.

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Macs at Apple headquarters breached through Java exploit, fix to be issued today

Apple has said that it has been attacked by hackers. The same group previously targeted Facebook. Computers at Apple’s Cupertino headquarters were attacked, the company said, but no data appears to have been stolen. Speaking to Reuters, Apple said that the intrusion was not widspread:

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Apple pulls malicious App Store app that took contacts, sent spam

Apple has removed a malicious app from the App Store that took the user's contacts and used them to send spam. Kaspersky Lab Expert Denis originally reported on the app, Find and Call, for Securelist, based on information from Russian carrier MegaFon.

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iOS security exploit exposed, already released in an Apple approved app [video]

An iOS security exploit, unveiled by security researcher Charlie Miller, allows an app to download and execute unsigned code from a remote unknown server. What’s even more astonishing, to prove the exact details of this hack, Charlie Miller developed and submitted an app containing the exploit to Apple. The app was approved and available in the App Store. (It has since been removed, and Charlie Miller has also now been removed from the iOS developer program.)

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