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Apple-backed China Clean Energy Fund has invested in three wind farms

Wind Farm
Wind Farm (Image credit: Apple)

What you need to know

  • The China Clean Energy Fund launched in 2018.
  • Apple and ten of its suppliers will invest almost $300m by 2022.
  • The new wind farms generate a combined 134 megawatts of energy.

The Apple-backed China Clean Energy Fund has invested in three wind farms that are capable of generating a combined 134 megawatts of energy for China's national power grid. Apple announced the investment via an Apple Newsroom (opens in new tab) post today.

Rising from the hills of Dao County in Hunan Province, China, beyond the city of Yongzhou, a dramatic sight appears on the horizon. Here, the massive blades of wind turbines from the Concord Jing Tang and Concord Shen Zhang Tang wind farms turn rhythmically in the sky. Developed by the Concord New Energy Group Limited, each farm generates 48 megawatts (MW) of clean energy. Along with a 38 MW farm in bordering Hubei province developed by Fenghua Energy Investment Group Co., Ltd., these three clean energy projects are the first investments of the China Clean Energy Fund.

The China Clean Energy Fund was launched in 2018 and includes investment from Apple as well as ten of its suppliers in the country. Between them almost $300 million will be invested into projects by 2022, Apple says. Those projects will total 1 gigawatt of renewable energy.

Wind farm turbine

Lisa Jackson, Apple's vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives, said that the fund is part of Apple's commitment to new energy solutions.

"To see these projects completed and already supplying clean energy to the grid is really exciting," said Lisa Jackson, Apple's vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives. "We are proud that suppliers participating in the fund share our commitment to supporting innovative energy solutions, cutting emissions and fighting climate change."

Apple repeatedly reaffirms its environmental credentials and this is another prime example of that. It recently confirmed that the Taptic Engines used in its newest iPhones are made from 100% recycled rare earth elements, too.

Oliver Haslam
Oliver Haslam

Oliver Haslam has written about Apple and the wider technology business for more than a decade with bylines on How-To Geek, PC Mag, iDownloadBlog, and many more. He has also been published in print for Macworld, including cover stories. At iMore, Oliver is involved in daily news coverage and, not being short of opinions, has been known to 'explain' those thoughts in more detail, too.

Having grown up using PCs and spending far too much money on graphics card and flashy RAM, Oliver switched to the Mac with a G5 iMac and hasn't looked back. Since then he's seen the growth of the smartphone world, backed by iPhone, and new product categories come and go. Current expertise includes iOS, macOS, streaming services, and pretty much anything that has a battery or plugs into a wall. Oliver also covers mobile gaming for iMore, with Apple Arcade a particular focus. He's been gaming since the Atari 2600 days and still struggles to comprehend the fact he can play console quality titles on his pocket computer.